why didn't I diy?

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Old 08-12-16, 10:58 AM
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why didn't I diy?

I promised my wife when I got the deck finished I'd build a picnic table. Building one my self would be about $25 cheaper but mainly I'd know it was built right. Well other projects have been getting in the way and I finally stained the deck earlier this week so my wife says lets go get a table. Went to Lowes and they were $98 but I figured at least I'd have more time for other stuff so we bought one and found out they cost $118 since they are put together .... wife says that's ok we'll pay the extra

My wife picked out the table [not the easiest one to get to] and we got it loaded up. After we got home I noticed that everyone of the top boards where installed with the cup facing down Had the weather been cooler maybe I would have noticed prior to loading it. Going in/out of the AC with the heat wave we've been having tends to give me a headache

Guess I can always replace the top in a few years if it gets too bad.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 02:27 PM
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Oilcloth table cloth.... hides everything.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 02:41 PM
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She'll probably set a table cloth on it when we use it but there is too much wind atop this hill to leave one on it. She has a steel glider in the yard that gets tumbled across the yard from time to time
 
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Old 08-12-16, 05:35 PM
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Funny how we never really learn from our lessons of the past. I have a got ya moment creep up on me from time to time as well. Must just be us "young guys" learning some of life's hard knocks.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 06:34 PM
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Well you could have done like some parks, concrete blocks for legs and a poured concrete top. Guaranteed never to warp or rot.... but a beatch to move to a new house.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 06:36 PM
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As we get older we know we can build it ourselves but we say the hell with it.
Just for kicks you should go back to them and look at the other tables and see if they are all build like that. If not I would bring it back for an exchange.
 
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Old 08-12-16, 11:00 PM
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Many years ago I started buying wood working tools first it was a table saw then a radial arm saw and finally a planer and jointer. I also bought various other tools that you could use by hand like a router and a biscuit jointer. I was thinking I could make some furniture like Norm Abram on the New Yankee Workshop, I never did. I did buy some furniture you put together(which isn't completely done to this day) and I made better plywood bottoms for them. Other than that I really haven't used my tools too much to make things.

Currently I am painting a used table that I bought at a thrift store and I will be putting a table together that I bought on Amazon.com that I hope has all of the screw holes matching. With things being made over seas though which I think this is I just wonder. I imagine I could even make a table like that with enough patience and a lathe(which I don't have but always wanted) I stopped myself from buying one though when I realized it would take up too much room after buying a drill press. I also though don't have the patience and tend to go to other projects.

For Christmas one year I did make some shelves for people that were made of pine and they had wooden coat pegs, I think they turned out quite well. I also made some geese on stands that I saw in a magazine for a church bazaar one year. Other than that I haven't made a great deal of things in my shop but I do get more satisfaction out of making it myself rather than buying it pre-made.
 
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Old 08-13-16, 02:22 AM
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could have done like some parks, concrete blocks for legs and a poured concrete top
Not sure my wood deck would support it, besides you know how women like to rearrange stuff - that would kill my back

As we get older we know we can build it ourselves but we say the hell with it.
Just for kicks you should go back to them and look at the other tables and see if they are all build like that. If not I would bring it back for an exchange.
When I was younger economics pretty much demanded that I diy. I still enjoy diy! but it seems to take more effort than it used to My wife rejected the other tables they had because of cracks, sap or other bad places in the wood. IMO it's not worth the effort to return it.

Obviously whoever put the table together didn't know a lot about working with wood but then I guess you shouldn't expect much from low wage employees. I once bought a new mower that wouldn't cut very good until I figured out that the blade was installed upside down. Never did find out if it was the store or the factory that goofed.
 
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Old 08-13-16, 03:17 AM
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In my younger days I would Do-It-Myself for two reasons, the first being that I could not afford to have someone else do it and the second that I rarely could find anyone that could do as good a job as I. Now I have to add that while I am nominally right-handed when it comes to woodworking I have fourteen thumbs and they are all left-hand thumbs. I've always blamed it on the tools but most often they were the same tools my daddy would use without any problems whatsoever.

There are two areas where I do excel in DIY (or DIM) and that is plumbing and electrical. I can get by with rough carpentry but I try to avoid any kind of finish work if at all possible. When I have to do finish work I use a lot of wood dough and trim moldings. I'm an okay painter but I have always tried to avoid painting as much as possible. Maybe that is because my daddy used to tell me that had I shown the slightest inclination towards wanting to become a professional painter he would have cheerfully broken both my arms.

I used to do a lot of automotive repairs as well but I pretty much stopped with the 1980 model year when electronics started making huge inroads. These past few days as I replaced the front brakes on my old (1997) Camry reminded me why I so thoroughly dislike automobile work.

I like metal working but I'm only average in performance. I can weld steel to a degree (especially when it is flat) and while I no longer have the "touch" I once had, I can use a cutting torch fairly well. When I worked at the electric utility I got so good with the torch that I could burn out pipe nipples threaded into boiler drums without damaging the internal thread.

Nowadays with my various ailments mostly what I do is dream about what I would do if I were thirty years younger AND had a six-figure income.
 
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Old 08-13-16, 04:09 AM
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Ya, thinking about the work that needs doing isn't as taxing on the old body as actually do the work

I do enjoy most facets of diy although I seem to fall apart nowadays when I start to sweat more than a little bit and it doesn't take a lot for my back to get mad at me Poor eyesight also makes most jobs harder than they ought to be

For whatever reason I don't care much for plumbing ..... but I dislike paying a plumber more!
Seems like with plumbing you always wind up in an awkward position and getting wet.
 
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