The Dr's office

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  #1  
Old 08-27-16, 08:43 AM
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The Dr's office

I had two appointments this week with two separate Dr's. As requested, I showed up 15 minutes early each time. Then I sat for a half hour in the waiting room before being taken to an exam room by a med assistant. In both cases they took my vitals, entered the info in a computer and left saying "the Dr will be right in."

At one appointment the DR showed up 20 minutes later. At the other she was 15 minutes late. Neither apologized for wasting my time. Both Dr's were with me less than 10 minutes.

Anyone ever have a Dr apologize for being late?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-27-16, 08:52 AM
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My eye doctor is probably the best doctor I go to when it comes to be punctual. I'll get there 5-10 minutes before my appointment time, check in and sit in the waiting rm for 5-10 minutes. The nurse will take me to the 1st rm and do all the preliminary checks. She then takes me to the exam rm where I wait 4-6 minutes. When the doc enters the first things he says is 'how are you? sorry you had to wait'

I wish all my other doctors could take lessons from him!
 
  #3  
Old 08-27-16, 09:02 AM
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You are never thanked getting to a doctors office early or on time.... but try getting there late.
It's like a crisis. :NO NO NO:
 
  #4  
Old 08-27-16, 10:09 AM
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After waiting 30 minutes to get registered in the emergency room with my hand wrapped on a blood soaked towel I then waited 4 hours to get to the med tech and another 30 minutes to see a doctor. I'll take the wait times mentioned any day. I thought about passing out onto the floor, but figured I might wake up some place i didn't want to be.

As for the doctors office, the wait times are not controlled by the doctor, but the staff and how well tuned-in they are to the time the doctor takes with each patient. I would assume all heck would break loose if the doctor found him/herself standing around because no one was scheduled to be next. And likewise if there were 5 people waiting hours because they were scheduled to close together.

Waiting in line, be it the doctors office or airport, has become a way of life.

Bud
 
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Old 08-27-16, 10:48 AM
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It's probably not going to change. Carry a good book with you whenever you are going for an appointment. It won't change the wait time but at least you won't be sitting staring at the walls.
 
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Old 08-27-16, 11:21 AM
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I always download the required paperwork from their website and fill it out, copy it, and take a copy of my medical history to any first appointment. Saves a bunch of time. I've got one coming up in September. Not looking forward to it. But wifey says I am 10 years overdue for a colonoscopy. I'm fine. Doesn't matter, you need one. OK.
 
  #7  
Old 08-27-16, 11:27 AM
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With my previous doctor I would arrive a few minutes prior to the appointment and then usually wait from 15 to 45 minutes before being called back to the examining room. There the MA would take my vitals and when he left would start another time period, generally 10 minutes or more before the doctor himself entered. He almost always wanted blood tests and the wait for the blood draw was often 45 minutes.

I changed doctors and now I usually don't even get a chance to sit down in the waiting area but immediately go to the examining room. The MA checks my vitals and in less than five minutes, often less than two minutes, the doctor enters. She gives me all the time I want without ever trying to hurry me out.


And yes, I HAVE had doctors apologize for being late. When I first saw the pulmonary specialist he was about 30 minutes late. The very first thing he did upon entering the exam room was to apologize for being late and then he explained why he was late. Every subsequent appointment was within a few minutes of the designated time.

I don't know about medical clinics in the sticks but in an urban setting there is NO excuse for having to wait more than just a few minutes UNLESS there has been an emergency and in those rare cases the patient should be apprised of the expected delay and given a choice to wait or to reschedule.
 
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Old 08-27-16, 12:57 PM
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I schedule my visits first thing in the morning so there are not any other patients clogging the system in front of me. If anything, others wait because of me.
 
  #9  
Old 08-27-16, 03:23 PM
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After waiting 30 minutes to get registered in the emergency room with my hand wrapped on a blood soaked towel I then waited 4 hours to get to the med tech and another 30 minutes to see a doctor
Sounds similar to when I sawed off the tip of my thumb My son took me to the ER since I had to clamp a rag over my thumb to slow the bleeding. We were slowing going thru the check in process when a nurse came up and asked to look at my thumb, when I released the pressure the blood started flowing and she whisked me back and wrapped it up thicker than I thought possible and took me to a large room where my son later joined me. 2 hrs later the doc came in, looked at and ordered an xray. 45 minutes later they came for the xray, I started to get up and they said stay put and wheeled the machine over that was about 5' away. Waited another 2 hrs and then they bandaged it up and sent me on my way.

I agree there is no excuse for long delays on an ongoing basis. I also try to schedule my appointments for 1st thing but that has come back to bite me when I found out the doctor wasn't expected to get there for another hour
 
  #10  
Old 08-27-16, 08:14 PM
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I made an appointment for 8 in the morning to see a new doctor. He showed up about 9 and the first thing I asked was if he had had an emergency. He replied no and then I asked if he was usually this late for for an 8 AM appointment. He resented that, stating he wasn't sure he wanted me for a patient. I replied that I WAS sure that I didn't want him for a doctor...and walked out.

I generally prefer to be the first patient after the lunch break. This kid doesn't "do" mornings unless it is absolutely unavoidable.
 
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Old 08-28-16, 03:42 AM
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My orthopedic surgeon (two knees and a shoulder) is classically late to see you. Not hours, but probably 30 minutes. BUT once he is in your room, he takes time to show you xrays, and talks about most anything. THAT's the reason he is late. His office staff has a "lag" time around lunch where his "clock" is regrouped and things get back on schedule. Not a bad way to handle it.
 
  #12  
Old 08-28-16, 05:01 AM
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I asked was if he had had an emergency. He replied no and then I asked if he was usually this late for for an 8 AM appointment. He resented that, stating he wasn't sure he wanted me for a patient. I replied that I WAS sure that I didn't want him for a doctor...and walked out.
Not a smart move. But certainly a very satisfying one.

So who got the short end of the stick by your actions? The doctor has no shortage of patients and actually you lightened his load. He has a skill that you need and you have no particular skill that he needs. The chances of you needing his skills again (not by choice but by chance) by him specifically are greater than most other meeting with people in other fields (Think in terms of emergency room, or disaster scenario, or referrals by other doctors).

You on the other hand had to find another doctor, book another appointment and most likely waited in his office the same way you did for the first doctor.

I understand you frustration but I would never say that to his face. I would however, make it known to others how he treats his patients and his tardiness and lack of apology. That will do more "harm" to his practice than what you did. Kind of like a sting operation.

One more comment. There are many doctors I dislike and I have had to work with doctors in some of my jobs. Many but not all tend to think they are demigods and are boastful, haughty, think they know more than most people, bully others in their profession and think they are privileged.

On the other hand they work at least 14 hours a day, spend hundreds of thousands on education, and years to get to where they are. Most are in debt for many years until they get established. They must put up with hospital administration that has little to do with health care. Insurance cost kill them and most have some kind of law suit against them. And by the way, if they can't cure your ailment then they are considered a failure, even though everybody dies or has an ailment by virtue of being human. And last but not least, they deal with human life. No matter what profession you are in, no one has more responsibility or more at risk than doctors do.

And its just not doctors who treat humans. Veterinarians have the same problems.

I'll wait the extra hour or so to get the treatment I need, but don't want.
 
  #13  
Old 08-28-16, 05:27 AM
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Norm, I disagree with almost everything you wrote. This particular doctor was a urologist and the greater Seattle area probably had at the time (some thirty years or so ago) at least 100 urologists. The chances of me ever needing the services of this particular doctor were just slightly better than the moon falling out of the sky.

More recently (a few years ago) I saw a sports medicine specialist. There was nothing concrete I could point to, I just plain did not feel a "connection" to this doctor. I mentioned it to my regular doctor and she gave me a different doctor to see. Both of these doctors have been listed as "Top Docs" in Seattle publications. I also was seeing an endocrinologist for a while but just didn't feel I was getting my money's worth as an appointment might last all of seven minutes. He was a friendly, likeable man and I guess he knew his stuff but he always seemed in a hurry to get me out of the office. I asked my regular doc and she sent me to a different endocrinologist, a woman, that spent no less than 45 minutes with me at every appointment AND did a thorough physical exam each time, something the previous man never did.

I stand firm that at least in urban areas there is NO reason to put up with a doctor with whom you cannot develop a personal rapport. Over my lifetime I have seen several doctors one time only because they just didn't "feel right" to me. It is my opinion that when it comes to doctors it is a very good idea to trust your instincts.
 
  #14  
Old 08-28-16, 10:15 AM
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He resented that, stating he wasn't sure he wanted me for a patient. I replied that I WAS sure that I didn't want him for a doctor...and walked out.
Oh No! You didn't know about the doctors patient attitude waiting list? There is a list. Doctors talk to each other. Word spreads in the doctors clubs & country clubs about patients whom have an attitude! Patients with such attitudes as you've expressed.

Unannounced to you your then added to all doctors extended times waiting list!... Wait times for patients on that list can wait far much longer then patients not on that list... Word has it the wait times may exceed 45 minutes to one hour or more...

Suggestion: COOL OFF and remain CHILLED OUT! Aggravations can cause increased blood pressures and possible coronary heart failures, etc.!...

COOL OF Med:
 
  #15  
Old 08-28-16, 02:35 PM
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I have had several primary doctors in my life time and many of them made me wait for a long time until my most recent doctor. What made me mad though was a woman doctor who took over for a male doctor who sold his practice. The male doctor still had an interest in the practice but never showed himself again as he started working at a clinic in semi-retirement.

Waiting in the office was not a big deal although when you went there you usually had to wait a while and then she would see you. What made us mad though where the unnecessary tests that she wanted to do on us and the frequency of when we had to return to her office which was unnecessary. One of us needed a very important medicine but she would not refill it unless she saw you again and we told them we had obligations elsewhere and were concerned about some bad weather coming which didn't seem to phase them in the least.

I told them off though I said we need this medicine it is critical for the survival of one of us and that if I didn't get it for the family member I would sue them for malpractice. That didn't phase them either and sure enough that bad storm came which I told them would come and it ripped the roof off of a company owned pharmacy we used at the time. So my mom and I switched pharmacies to an independent pharmacy that wasn't affected by the storm and was closer. I don't know what the pharmacist said to the doctor to this day but do know they had a heated conversation.

To make a long story short we finally received our medication and said goodbye to that witch of a doctor and finally have the doctor we have now. I told him when I first saw him that there may be instances where we can't come in due to bad weather coming or a family emergency and that we don't want our medicine held back. I said if it happened with him I would find another doctor who understands us better. He hasn't held back any medication yet and is a great deal better about understanding people and their needs.
 
  #16  
Old 08-28-16, 05:38 PM
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Furd, actually we don't disagree. I would never expect myself or anyone else to stay with a doctor if you don't feel comfortable with them. Regardless of how good they are. Chemistry means everything. Case in point is my recent encounter with a urologist concerning my kidney stone episode. His first encounter with me was the suggestion of surgery. No if, ands or buts as far as he was concerned. Surgery or nothing. Needles to say I said no. No smart reply, no reason to give, just no thanks and left. My kidney stones passed or dissolved on their own (I don't know which ). What need was there to confront him. Besides the day may come when he might be the guy I need to see. Sure there are hundreds of urologist in my area but he is considered one of the best and serves my local hospital and area. Why burn a bridge?

Be it human or animal doctor, my daughter tells every client that if they don't feel comfortable with her or another doctor then by all means look for another, no hard feelings.

Concerning the wait times is very disturbing and perhaps uncalled for but there are two sides to every coin and I was trying to show what doctors must put up with. And lets not even go where they have to put up with strange patients. If you manage to find a doctor or a doctor with a good staff and they are able to fit you in on a timely basis then great. But way too many things happen in between to expect constant on time service from a doctor. Heck, even the cable service can't be on time to fix a stupid electronic gizmo and you expect a doctor to keep a perfect appointment calendar? I don't see doctors very often, but if my health issue is important enough to warrant a doctor, I'll give him all then time he needs.

Referring to Hedge's post:
As far as the new doctor insisting on running test that you have been through several times with the old doctor does not mean that they can just take your word or the word of the other doctor that everything is fine. I don't like it but either but their reputation and lively hood depends on a first hand information. OK, I'll admit they do go to extremes and much of it is due to insurance procedures and money making. But, would you just take the word of a previous plumbers, or electrician's work without inspection and assume they did the job correctly before proceeding with additional work or adding equipment?

And Sharp Advice's post (#14) may be in jest, but I bet there is a lot of truth to it. Heck, we tag and talk about customer who patronize our store.

I'm in complete agreement with your complaints but I would rather chill than confront them over my health.
 
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Old 08-28-16, 07:51 PM
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Okay, here's the rest of the story as well as some other stories that I may have shared in the past.

The doctor who made appointments for 8 AM while not arriving at the office until 9 AM was a urologist. I say was because I am sure he is now either retired or dead as that was some thirty years ago. He was supposed to be "one of the best" but I hear that statement so often regarding doctors I wonder how it can possibly be true in all cases. Anyway, I was looking for INFORMATION concerning a vasectomy and this guy was supposed to be so good that he also did reversals. I had absolutely no desire to EVER have the procedure reversed so I didn't need that expertise. However, everyone I saw in this man's office asked me if I was going to "do it" the same day. I even had one woman tell me, "It doesn't hurt!" at which I replied, "How would YOU know?" (As an aside I've known several men that were in severe pain for several days following.)


I went to my regular doctor one afternoon for some minor problem. (This was also some thirty years ago and was the same doctor that recommended the urologist.) It WAS maybe 4 in the afternoon and I didn't expect to be seen by the doctor at 4:02. However, at 5 I still hadn't heard a word as to when I might see the doctor. Finally about 5:15 the nurse called me back to the examining room. I told her the same thing I tell every single medical or dental provider, IF my appointment is going to be delayed more than about 15 minutes I want to be told so I can decide whether or not to wait or to make a new appointment. This old biddy got VERY uppity and acted like she and the doctor were doing me a huge favor by seeing me today rather than in six months. When the doctor came in I told him the same thing and he assured me it would never happen again. NOT that he might be running late, but that I would be told when they were running late. Several months later I had an appointment and when I entered the office the receptionist said, "Joel. we are running late and it will be at least 45 minutes before the doctor can see you." I asked her if she wanted me to come back on a different day and she incredulously ask if I would and when I replied yes she gave me an appointment for early in the next week and thanked me profusely.

The result was I didn't have to waste my time and it allowed the doctor to get back on schedule. Win-win. The following week when I came in everyone was still happy and I was again thanked for making the new appointment.


I had a similar experience at my dentist. The first time she misunderstood and thought it was that I didn't like to wait until I explained that it wasn't the waiting, it was waiting without being told why and without being given the option of rescheduling. I am actually a pretty easy going guy, I just want to KNOW what is happening and unless I am really hurting I am almost always going to opt for a rescheduled appointment and THAT is almost always going to help me, the doctor/dentist and the patients scheduled after me.

I KNOW that things happen and it is sometimes impossible to keep a schedule. But it is NEVER impossible to apprise the patient that there will be a serious delay in the doctor being able to see them. It should be universal that the office people know if the doctor is running late and if so, how late, and to be able to inform the patients of the delay. Once so informed it is then the patient's option to either wait or to reschedule. I think that is only common courtesy.

And yes, if I am going to be late for an appointment I DO call and let them know.
 
  #18  
Old 08-28-16, 10:52 PM
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As far as the new doctor insisting on running test that you have been through several times with the old doctor does not mean that they can just take your word or the word of the other doctor that everything is fine.
I agree with that Norm but this doctor repeatedly kept on doing the same types of tests over and over again which in my opinion wasn't necessary. After a while too her office wasn't very clean and when she moved from her old location a friend told us that her new location was dirty too. So unfortunately this doctor who shall remain nameless had a great deal of problems not only with her staff but also committing fraud with insurance agencies by continually running unnecessary tests. The office getting filthy too was a real turn off.

To top it off I asked for a few records to be forwarded but she no longer had my records and it had been only a few months since I left her office. When I requested my records to be forwarded they had already moved but by law they should have still had my records for at least 3 years. I could still sue for malpractice and probably win since she didn't have my records but I saw a review of her office online that talked about her bad practices. I doubt she will be in business much longer.
 
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