"Bee" sting

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  #1  
Old 07-20-17, 06:18 PM
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"Bee" sting

I typically get stung (wasps not bees) 3-4 times a year while working in the yard. No big deal. It's usually "ouch dammit!" and a minute later the pain is gone.

Today I got wasp stung twice in the cartilage of my ear. I've never had a sting hurt that much. On a scale of 1-10 it was definitely a 10. I don't know if the wasp was the big kahuna of the hive or if it just hit the right spot on my ear, but damn! I have never had a sting hurt that much. My ear turned beet red and swelled to twice the normal size (my wife said that my ear looked like I had gone 10 rounds with Joe Frazier) and 3 hours later it still hurt. The pain from the sting radiated down my neck to the point where I considered a trip to the ER. No concern about anaphylactic shock but I've never had any lingering sting problems. Now it's been almost 8 hours and my ear is still swollen and very tender.

Needless to say every friggen wasp in that nest has gone on to the "happy stinging grounds."
 
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Old 07-20-17, 06:41 PM
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I've had that happen too. Great way to ruin a day, especially if it's 10 am and you still have and lot of work to do on that customers house before you can quit for the day.

On the other hand, after being stung the satisfaction you get from killing every wasp you can find is much greater.
 
  #3  
Old 07-20-17, 11:31 PM
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I think this guy read the same story I did many years ago and here is how he used that information on a spider bite. Basically this should help with any venomous bite. More Googling will get you more articles but I have tried this with my own configuration, not as radical as an electric fence, and did get some relief, Maine black fly bite.

Electric shock therapy for spider, insect and snake bites. | Field & Stream

Bud
 
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Old 07-21-17, 09:49 AM
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Bud that link led to some interesting reading & thinking.
One thing I'm not clear on is if a high-voltage shock causes the breakdown & neutralization of poisonous venom to reduce tissue damage & death--what about allergic reactions? I'm quite allergic to bee stings so I'm interested but not sure if I would STILL have a reaction to the "scrambled" venom?

I quickly skimmed several articles but didn't see allergic reactions addressed--only poisoning & necrotic tissue damage.
 
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Old 07-21-17, 10:51 AM
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It was just one jungle story many years ago hoping to find some relief when no antivenin was available for snake bites, on his way into the deep jungle he got bitten by a very nasty bee/wasp where the anticipated results would have left him in serious trouble for several weeks. So he tried his shock treatment on the bee sting and the results were very good. Now, after many years there are tons of articles both pro and con, but I can't say I've seen anything specific to allergic reactions. Probably worth doing some reading just in case it might help.

Side note, a good friend had gone through his 3rd back surgery and they implanted a battery powered shock device. They increased it to the max he could tolerate but it improved his recovery significantly. So electricity and our body do have some connection.

Bud
 
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Old 07-21-17, 02:48 PM
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Isn't it odd how life goes. I've been stung by bees exactly 2 times in my life, both my fault (sitting on them and disturbing a nest in our hay loft) somehow. One unknown spider bite overseas. I've has bee's land on me and just groom for a sec then fly off. Wasps have landed on my arm walked around, "tasted" me and left. I've held venomous spiders and lizards w/o a problem. No experience with snakes. They just don't seem to be interested in me. None of the stings were all that painful or caused much of a reaction. Of course, I'm not allergic to poison ivy either. I guess I just have a pretty easy going physiology? Nothing really bothers it.
 
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Old 07-22-17, 06:27 AM
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Vic I'm jealous. Even a mosquito bite can raise a quarter-size red welt that itches for several days. I'd gladly tolerate being zapped with 50kv to get immediate relief.
 
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Old 07-22-17, 07:14 AM
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Advising people to zap themselves is a delicate issue so caution to anyone reading. Since my background is electronics and I'm rather used to getting zapped (used to work with the high voltage circuits for the old Picturephone) I was comfortable building something of my own, well below the 50kv range. I won't post my make shift arrangement here but I would bet there are some designs on the internet.
@guy I remember my mom was extremely sensitive to insect bites and years ago I used to be. Why my body changed I don't really know but one thing I do differently now is I take a LOT of supplements. There is a possibility that they are somehow reducing my reaction to the bites. Cuts and bruises all heal much faster now.

Bud
 
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Old 07-22-17, 09:55 AM
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There are a number of homeopathic remedies for bee sting pain (ammonia or onion juice, for two) but I've always used tobacco juice. I don't use tobacco in any other form but I keep a pack of Beechnut (brand) chewing tobacco in my fishing tackle box because it seems there's almost always bees and/or wasps about when I go fishing, especially when wading a stream or pond fishing.

Supposedly it's the nicotine that does the trick, so the tobacco needs to be moist so some of the nicotine can be transferred to the skin. Take a good pinch of tobacco, moisten it with water or spittle until it begins to turn your fingers brown, then press it to the sting site (after you've removed the stinger, where applicable). Pain should begin diminishing in seconds and swelling and inflammation should be reduced. Residue on the filter from a smoker's pipe supposedly is extremely effective because it will have lots of nicotine adhering to it.

A spider's gut is too narrow to swallow anything solid so they all feed exclusively by drinking. Very nearly all spiders are venomous (110 of the 113 families) and those that are feed by sucking up the liquefied tissue of their prey once their venom has caused it to melt/dissolve/rot [pick one]. And like bites from snakes, spider bites can be 'dry,' meaning you're bitten but there's little to no venom injected.

Almost all spiders are venomous but the venom of only a very few is toxic to humans. But considering our species is so diverse that some of us are allergic to eggs, peanuts and chocolate, it stands to reason that some of us are allergic to the venoms of some of even the non-poisonous ones. Luckily, that doesn't include me. I've been bitten at least a dozen times I was aware of and none of them were any more consequential or troubling (to me) than a mosquito bite.
 
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