DURACeramic by Congoleum ???


  #1  
Old 08-27-04, 06:50 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: canada
Posts: 119
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
DURACeramic by Congoleum ???

Looking to install this in our kitchen, hallway and front entrance. Its a hybrid product, looks like ceramic tile, however its warmer to the foot and quiet to walk on. Only been available for a year or so.

Any thoughts and or experiences with this product. Many thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 08-29-04, 07:33 AM
floorman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Don't have an opinion one way or the other on this as of yet,however i'm not a big fan of laminates and there are people coming out with gimmicks all the time that will fail in a couple years,i'm not saying this is one of them cuase i don't think it has been out long eneough to state one way or thew other as to how long this will last.

I just don,t like the floating system, an opinion only not based on anything but taste.Just the way i was taught,making everything as rigid and stiff as you can get it cause movement will kill a floor quicker than anything else,so i have a hard time accepting the laminate as a viable option for flooring,i install it but i would,nt put it my house.

So for now the jury is still out and will be a while before the verdict comes back on this stuff as far as longevity and wearability,check that,stability sorry could,nt be of more help if you plan on doing this please post back and let us know what you think
 
  #3  
Old 08-30-04, 06:33 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,073
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
With the beveled edges, compared to the DuraStone, this is actually a nice product.

The floor prep has to be flat! Those limestone tiles don't bend over irregularities of the subfloor.

Butt the tiles and seal the joints, or leave a grout space. Be sure to use a firm sponge, if you grout, along with a green 3M pad as required.
 
  #4  
Old 09-05-04, 09:16 AM
LisaCea
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Dura Ceramic is not a "laminate" nor is it a "floating floor system".
 
  #5  
Old 09-29-04, 05:12 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: canada
Posts: 119
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the good advice Lisa & Perry. We are going ahead with it c/w grout lines. For the subfloor, do I have to use plywood or can I get away with osb, not proboard of course. Just the cost of plywood here is twice that of osb - Many thanks
 
  #6  
Old 09-14-06, 08:08 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thumbs down I wouldn't recommend it

We had a very bad experience with the durability of this product. We installed in May of 2006 in our kitchen, mud room, and laundry area. Within four months, we've had dozens and dozens of nicks, gouges, and stains. I am shocked at how poor the performance is compared to ceramic, which I have installed in the hallways and bathroom adjacent to it and installed at the same time. I didn't expect it to hold up as well as ceramic, but I thought it would take a significant accident to cause permanent damage. Not the case at all. This is comparable performance to some of the cheaper vinyl flooring we had in our old house. It is terrible - I'd stay away and learn from my poor experience. Considering how much we paid for the product, we were really duped. Don't be a sucker for the advertising!
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-06, 02:09 PM
E
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 123
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
We have a large kitchen area with Durastone that we put in 3-4 years ago, and we are very happy with it. We installed it right over the old sheet vinyl floor and haven't had any problems with wear.
 
  #8  
Old 12-22-07, 07:40 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Exclamation Duraceramic

We had Congoleum Duraceramic installed in Feb. 2004 in our kitchen, laundry room and powder room on the main level of our house. We went with the product because it was advertised as being softer, warmer and better overall than ceramic tile. We paid a floor company $3,825.00 to supply and install the tile.

It is now almost four years old. We have had the floor company (and even the distributor of Congoleum products) out several times to replace chipped and gouged tiles, and the grout (we picked a light color grout and didn't seal it - the floor company didn't recommend it, nor did they discourage it - but we wish now we would have sealed the grout) has discolored.

I have to say that I am disappointed in the performance of the product. I just noticed that one of the tiles has cracked. It is also very apparent where the tiles have been replaced as you can see the difference in the color of the grout.

The relative softness of the product is both a blessing and a curse; it is softer on the feet/legs, but it gouges and scratches easier. If you drop a can of soup on the tile, it won't chip but it will gouge. Also, our medium-size dog's claws leave tiny but visible scratch marks on the tile surface.

If you decide to go with this product, I would recommend sealing the grout, especially if you go with a light colored grout as we did, and also using the proper cleaning procedure (Congoleum recommends using their special cleaner). We found out that products such as Pine Sol leave a residue.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: