Self-Stick Vinyl Tile Gaps


  #1  
Old 12-14-04, 08:57 AM
imagal49
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Unhappy Self-Stick Vinyl Tile Gaps

We're getting ready to install a Cryntel self-adhesive vinyl floor and when we opened the box, noticed each tile is beveled on all four edges. We're concerned that dirt will accumulate in the gap between tiles after installation and be incredibly difficult to remove. We were told we can't grout the seams. Does anyone have experience with this type of tile? How difficult is it going to be to keep those gaps clean, especially since the floor can't be washed with anything but vinyl floor cleaner.
 
  #2  
Old 02-13-07, 10:16 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smile Gaps

The tiles your talking about are fairly thick and high quality I am guessing. They have downward bevelled edges. You can buy an acrylic sanded grout (home depot) for these and actually grout the tiles. The finished product looks that of ceramic tile and is very hard to tell the difference. Make sure to use a grout sealant about 7 days later on all grouted seams.
 
  #3  
Old 02-14-07, 08:35 AM
thiggy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Alabama
Posts: 718
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Are you serious, grouting vinyl tile?
 
  #4  
Old 02-14-07, 11:42 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 12,019
Received 67 Votes on 56 Posts
???

Can't imagine it lasting very long before chipping out.
 
  #5  
Old 02-20-07, 07:14 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 71
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
DO NOT GROUT THE VINYL TILE.

When installed properly with each tile butted firmly against the surrounding tiles, resilient tile floor is a great floor and easy to keep clean. Just damp mop once in a while and refresh with their recommended cleaner.

Unless you leave gaps when installing it, there wont bea problem.

Over time it is possible any standing liquids may seep down and start to debond.

Wipe spills up quickly and leave no standing water and you will be fine.

That said, if waterproofing is what you are looking for and want the ultimate in ease of maintenance, a resilient sheet vinyl or linoleum is the best choice.
 
  #6  
Old 02-21-07, 01:39 PM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 730
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I have a little bit experience.

I have experience in your kinda tile! I replaced our asbestos tile w/ new vinyl self stick from lowes. It turned out GREAT!! We needed a semi temp. fix until we gut the kitchen and all that stuff!! I tore up the old tile, and slapped some floor leveling compound stuff down on the joints and any low spots or high spots, which I feathered out. We have only had to replace one b/c a nail popped up through one of the tile and replacing one is a breeze!!!!! We also added a dab of liquid nail kinda stuff to the corners and one in the middle of each tile. They make tubes of glue especially for self stick but the stuff we used was fine. It looks like rolled vinyl!! A lot of my relatives that didn't know I used self stick thought it was rolled vinyl sheeting. For some hints, make sure the floor is free of debris!! I swept that floor about 10 times while we were tiling!!. Also cutting the tile is tricky but my uncle took care of that and did a great job!! He used a utility knife. The stuff we bought was not like 1/4" thick or anything but it was as thick as 2 penny's and a dime!! That is not a way to measure but I don't feel like digging out the box. If you need me to I will. If the subfloor is nailed make sure all nails are well buried. If not pull them up and put new ones in next to the old hole. I forget the name of the board that was made up of the subfl. but it wasn't what it was suppose to be there. Its still working though!!! Here are the finished pics on my yahoo photos site. http://new.photos.yahoo.com/diyplank/album/576460762390699049

Also you can use a wax on it after about 2 weeks and that will help keep water/debris from getting into those cracks. Our tile is not beveled on the sides so we don't really have a problem like that. Also the rumors about them shrinking after a yr. If it is going to happen it hasn't happened yet and it has been a yr and 3 months. If you have any more questions let me know. I am no pro but I became well informed after all the research I did on this stuff. If it were me I would not use grout!! That is crazy. Seems like it would just smear all over the tile and not stay in the grooves. GOOD LUCK
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-07, 01:44 PM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 730
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
OH yeah, about the rolled vinyl that floorman suggest, Crazy expensive. I went to 5 different flooring places in town, and installed for our kitchen was like 1200 bucks for the cheapest stuff they could find!! I did my kitchen for about 500 bucks and that includes the case of Beer I bought my dad and uncle for helping me!!!! My kitchen included a kitchen nook, and laundry room, and pantry, if your kitchen is perfectly square then you might be able to find cheaper prices to have it installed. They told me that since my kitchen is a weird shape that it added to the total price for labor and seeming and all that junk.
 
  #8  
Old 02-23-07, 05:50 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 71
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
With all due respect, there are different grades of resilient flooring product at corresponding levels of expense for each, whether that be resilient tile, resilient sheet, or even carpet.

Of course, the higher grades are the most expensive for a one time purchase, but considering they last 20-50 years with proper maintenance, I consider that a less expensive TRUE VALUE than purchasing bottom line product every 5 years.
 
  #9  
Old 02-23-07, 08:00 AM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 730
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I didn't mean to disrespect you. We purchased the self stick b/c we are going to be gutting the kitchen in about 4 yrs or so. So we didn't wanna spend 1200, 1500 or more just for a 4 yr flooring. We didn't get the cheapest tile either. They were around 1.98 or so a piece. That was mid to high range price at lowes. We didn't do it the cheapest way possible, but it was way cheaper than rolled vinyl, and even the newer kind which is the fiberglass that you just lay down. No adhesive or anything necessary. Sorry if I pi$$ed ya off, I didn't mean to.
 
  #10  
Old 02-25-07, 06:15 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Can I polyurthane vinyl tiles?

We just layed the Cryntel slate stone vinyl tiles. These have the beveled edge. I have noticed a sealer at Lowes for vinyl seams, but it is a little tiny bottle for $10.00. My husband suggested coating the entire floor with polyurethane. Is this possible? It is on a kitchen floor, with a plywood subfloor. I would appreciate any advice.
 
  #11  
Old 02-25-07, 07:03 AM
diyplank's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Williamsport
Posts: 730
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I know you can wax the floor about 2 weeks after install. Not sure on the poly.
The wax will help keep dirt, debris, and water out of the cracks.
 
  #12  
Old 02-25-07, 08:09 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 71
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
if it is a "NO-WAX" vinyl floor then you may have issues with both waxing and polyurethane adhering to the no-wax wear layer, which could cause spotty adhesion, flaking/chipping, and peeling.

I would not suggest that route.
 
  #13  
Old 02-28-07, 05:12 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
no wax floor

We do not have a "NO WAX" floor. The instructions state that it can be waxed. Has anyone used polyurethane over peel and stick tiles?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: