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rip out old vinyl or put plywood over it? and other questions!

rip out old vinyl or put plywood over it? and other questions!

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  #1  
Old 08-04-05, 12:17 PM
pateacher
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Question underlayment vs. self leveler

I want to lay self adhesive vinyl tiles with a beveled edge in my kitchen, laundry room, bathroom and hall. I am laying these tiles over sheet embossed linoleum in the kitchen, old viyl tiles in the bath and laundry (also embossed) and a wood subfloor in the hall (currently covered with rug) . There is a wood subfloor in the kitchen and the rest is on a concrete slab. I'm worried about asbestos and don't want to remove the older stuff. Would I be better off laying 1/4 inch underlayment over it all or using a self leveler? Self leveler seems more my speed. If I do lay plywood over everything, how do I do it?

Any help would be appreciated.
 

Last edited by pateacher; 08-07-05 at 10:20 AM. Reason: got some answers
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  #2  
Old 08-08-05, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by pateacher
I want to lay self adhesive vinyl tiles with a beveled edge in my kitchen, laundry room, bathroom and hall. I am laying these tiles over sheet embossed linoleum in the kitchen, old viyl tiles in the bath and laundry (also embossed) and a wood subfloor in the hall (currently covered with rug) . There is a wood subfloor in the kitchen and the rest is on a concrete slab. I'm worried about asbestos and don't want to remove the older stuff. Would I be better off laying 1/4 inch underlayment over it all or using a self leveler? Self leveler seems more my speed. If I do lay plywood over everything, how do I do it?

Any help would be appreciated.
Leveling compound offers limited success even if done properly, as I know a few "strictly by the book" people who ended up having the old design telegraph through to the new tile. I would definitely put down plywood - use 1/4" BC plywood - and attach it with ring shank underlayment nails. Make sure your nails are the proper size, because you don't want to be nailing into concrete. (Or trying to, rather). If you can put down plywood, that's the best way to go. Ring shanks are a good way to attach the underlayment. However, if you only have old linoleum or vinyl directly on concrete, you won't have anything to attach the plywood to.

In this case, I think you might be better off going with a tile backerboard of some sort attached with Thinset or some other adhesive. Hardboard attached with some sort of glue might be efficient as well, but I'm not sure about either of those. Gluing softer things (like plywood and hardboard) with strong adhesives generally tends to cause warping, so I'd consult with a professional first.

You certainly don't want to try and attach plywood to concrete, as that certainly won't work. I would think only tile backerboard would be good as underlayment for concrete. Vinyl can be placed directly on concrete as long as it's dry and smooth, but if you've already got linoleum down it's not going to be smooth when removed. Depending on your budget, leveling compound may be the route to go on the non-kitchen rooms. Be warned, it's not as easy as it sounds.

Definitely put down plywood in the kitchen. It makes things much easier. I put down plywood in my kitchen before reflooring and the hardest part about it was motivating myself to cut the wood when I needed to.
 
  #3  
Old 08-14-05, 04:21 PM
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plywood over concrete is scary!!!

You better read up on how to do it, urethane adhesive is about $1 a foot, at the recommended spread rate of 45 - 50 sq.ft per gallon, at about $25 per gallon.


Be sure to check moisture emission from the concrete in the areas you want this, because a roll or trowel on moisture blocker / adhesive system is wisely recommended, or you could have a failure later.
 
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