vinyl tiles over linoleum

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Old 09-26-05, 08:27 PM
gdwright3
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vinyl tiles over linoleum

I want to lay 12x12 self stick vinyl tiles in my kitchen. The existing floor is covered with sheet linoleum. The edges are curling, cracking and torn in places, so it's too bad to glue back down. The floor is already raised so I can't put down a new underlayment. I thought I could just pull the linoleum up but the paper backing and adhesive is sticking to the floor underneath. What can I do so tiles will stick? I don't mind manual labor, but I'm on a tight budget and don't have much time to complete job. Please help.
 
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Old 09-27-05, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by gdwright3
I want to lay 12x12 self stick vinyl tiles in my kitchen. The existing floor is covered with sheet linoleum. The edges are curling, cracking and torn in places, so it's too bad to glue back down. The floor is already raised so I can't put down a new underlayment. I thought I could just pull the linoleum up but the paper backing and adhesive is sticking to the floor underneath. What can I do so tiles will stick? I don't mind manual labor, but I'm on a tight budget and don't have much time to complete job. Please help.
If your floor is already raised, you may want to make sure that it hasn't already been raised before. If you can find plywood underneath, you might be able to pry it up and put down new underlayment for the vinyl. It's probably unusual (depending on the age of your house) for the kitchen to be significantly higher than surrounding flooring originally. If you can't and you simply want to remove the linoleum - AND there isn't too much adhesive residue - a cheap and easy solution is to sand the adhesive. Renting an orbital sander should give you a fairly smooth surface to work with and, if you're lucky, remove all the adhesive. If you have a handheld sander, that will also work. It will take some time.

Consider that if the linoleum is older, you might be facing asbestos. Also, if there is a significant amount of adhesive residue, you'll need to remove it. You can do this manually, with a paint scraper, a heat gun, water and dish soap, or mineral spirits. It depends on the type of adhesive.
 
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