Securing Multiply on Vinyl Floor (screws, nails, staples)


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Old 11-22-06, 08:15 AM
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Securing Multiply Underlayment for Vinyl Floor (screws, nails, or staples?)

I'm about to put a new vinyl sheet floor in our kitchen (about 80 sqft). The house is old, so rather than ripping up the old vinyl, I will be laying new underlayment. The floor currently has the following layers: 5/8" subfloor, 1/2" plywood (to get it to the same height as adjacent hardwood floor in dining room), vinyl floor. I will be putting 1/4" SurePly underlayment on top of the current vinyl and then gluing the new vinyl to that.

My question is, what is the best way to secure the new underlayment down? I have deck screws, but after reading some posts in this forum it seems like screws aren't the best because they don't allow the floor to easily be taken up in the future. I can't find anywhere in my area that has an underlayment stapler to rent, either. Could I get by by using 8p ring shank nails? If so, how long do they need to be? And should I countersink them and then emboss in the countersink hole?

Thanks in advance for the help!
 

Last edited by coolguy982; 11-22-06 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 11-22-06, 08:53 AM
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Getting the floor up in the future really shouldn't be a consideration for this project. Keeping it down while in use is much more important. If getting it up later is really an issue, why not consider some of the no-glue vinyls? They don't require an underlayment and will roll right up if need be. Go to a local flooring store and they can show them to you. The backing on this vinyl is not that grey felt back we're so used to and won't tear up while being handled. The stuff is very homeowner installation friendly, is very tough, and, when you consider the underlayment savings, is usually less expensive. You don't need to buy underlayment, you don't need to spend the time to put it down, you don't buy the fasteners for the underlayment, you don't buy glue in any great degree, Just roll it out, trim it in, and re-install the base. Provided the existing floor isn't all torn up, floor prep is minimal. Having said all that, back to the underlayment. The product should have instructions for installation. read them and make sure I don't lead you astray because this is how I do it, not necessarily how they may want it done. I use drywall screws. Nails, over time, can back out and start to show under the vinyl as bumps. I've had instances where I've used ring shank nails, but I don't like it. The screws hold very securely and will not back out, and they can be counter sunk below the surface of the underlayment. I don't like nails because it's difficult to get the heads down far enough that they aren't an issue later in the installation. Floor prep, when installing full spread vinyl, is the job. It's like doing sheet rock. All the work to get the wall smooth and ready for paint takes the majority of the time and, if not done well, causes the paint to look bad. With full spread vinyl, the floor must be as smooth as a baby's skin or the vinyl will look bad. Nail head bumps don't look good. Make sure you use enough of them. I put them every three inches around the perimeter and every six inches in the field. I can't explain the physics involved, I just know what I've seen. As it dries, the glue will shrink and draw any areas not securely fastened up off the floor causing bubbles consisting of vinyl and underlayment. When fastening, start in one corner and fan out the fasteners into the opposite corner. If you don't, you may cause humps in the underlayment by trapping the fullness between the screws.
 
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Old 12-02-06, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by coolguy982 View Post
My question is, what is the best way to secure the new underlayment down?
We use Senko SKS 1/4" crown pneumatic staple guns with the L-Series 1.5" length staples. They can be rented from most local tool rental facilities along with an electric air compressor. These are superior because the low profile of the 1/4" crown requires no further preparation of the anchor entry point/hole in the underlayent, and their anchoring power is unparalleled.

Originally Posted by coolguy982 View Post
I have deck screws, but after reading some posts in this forum it seems like screws aren't the best because they don't allow the floor to easily be taken up in the future. I can't find anywhere in my area that has an underlayment stapler to rent, either. Could I get by by using 8p ring shank nails? If so, how long do they need to be? And should I countersink them and then emboss in the countersink hole?Thanks in advance for the help!
Yes, inch and a half ring shanks can be used. Hammer them in so there is a slight indentation from the hammer head slightly below the surrounding underlayment surface. Patch them with an approved cement based floor patch like ardex featherfinish: http://obscurity.ws/search.php?query=ardex+feather+finish

its iperative that if you nail the ring shanks into open space or they dont grab sufficiently you pull them out or they will pop and telegraph through the resilient later.

after the patch dries, scrap and sand flat, then recoat and repeat until the floor is slooth and flat.

shop vac or sweep clean and instal resilient

lastly, I would recheck around for the senco sks ..it is really with it if you can find one.
 
 

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