Just Removed Vinyl/Linoleum sheeting. Asbestoes?


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Old 12-09-06, 04:59 PM
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Just Removed Vinyl/Linoleum sheeting. Asbestoes?

Finally took up the kitchen flooring (probably vinyl, but could be linoleum)
Now I looked online to figure out about how to remove the black tar paper? stuff underneath, and I see threads on asbestos.
I thought the asbestos was just in tiles from prior searches, had no idea could be in sheeting.
It mostly came up in very large pieces. Took a crowbar to loosen a bit underneath. It was cracking some anyway. Have no idea when it was put in, 80 yr old house, was just the one sheet of flooring. BF took his hepa filtered wet dry vac and vaccumed and I have the door open with the fan blowing out even though it is close to freezing here.
Is this horrible?
What should I do?

Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 12-09-06, 05:02 PM
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It's a little late to worry about asbestos. If installing new vinyl, simply cover floor with 1/4" plywood underlayment for vinyl floors. You can also float an engineered or laminate floor over it. If on wood subfloor, you can cover with roofing felt and install solid hardwood.
 
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Old 12-10-06, 02:26 PM
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So does that mean it's not a problem? Can find no "after" info, just "before".
Should I not worry about it? All other info has sent me into a panic. So I'm confused
 
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Old 12-10-06, 04:58 PM
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It sounds as if you've got very old Linoleum. It was not full spread glued and was installed over tar paper. The floor under it was often an Oak hardwood and, if not damaged or rotted too badly, refinishes beautifully. Twelvepole is correct, if there was asbestos in the Linoleum, the damage is done. I'm not sure there's any in the tar paper, but someone else may know or you may be able to get some information on the web somewhere. I know I've pulled up lots of it and haven't grown any extra ears or developed any respiratory problems. I'd tear some of it away to see what's under it. You may get a pleasant surprise.
 
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Old 12-15-06, 11:08 PM
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it always pays to test for asbestos in old flooring.

i recommend getting a local company to come test the adhesives and paper for asbestos content and go from there.

I am not trying to alarm, but there are real health reasons why there are federal handling and removal laws concerning asbestos.

if you cant find a local company, you can buy a test kit and mail it in and get an answer back in a week or so for a very reasonable fee.

Quite a few companies make them.

http://obscurity.ws/search.php?query=asbestos+test+kit

after that, then you can decide on a course of action.
 
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Old 12-18-06, 09:50 AM
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Thanks for comments so far.

Well I had it tested, the vinyl sheeting is 20% asbestos. The black stuff has none.
So now what? There is no information online about what to do after you've removed it, although after extensive searching I am by far not the only one. The only opinions seem to be Fear: you are going to die, or It's no big deal.

I would like to find out what I can actually do.

I dont have thousands of $, but I can probably get it air sampled.

I'm kinda unhappy that if this stuff is so dangerous, they why didn't the real estate people tell me, they only talked about lead paint, which seems to be less of a risk. If there are legal issues, why didn't someone tell me?

Also for anyone else searching, the testing cost $18 a sample, I drove it to a testing place/lab myself. To get an abatement company to do it they wanted $45, and that was still me taking the sample to them. They would have sent it to a lab.
 
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Old 12-18-06, 02:11 PM
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It isn't dangerous if handled properly and remains non-friable.

The danger comes in when it is disturbed (made friable), ripped up, sanded, scraped, drilled, making the asbestos fibers/particles airborn and breathable.

When breathed into the lungs its a health risk, which is why the federal government stepped in made illegal the use of it in any manufacturing or construction, mining of it, and improper removal and disposal.

Some people dont think its a big deal handling it.

The real professionals do becasue its against the law, and there are considerable fines if the laws arent followed and you are caught breaking them.

I am not trying to scare you, just inform you of the facts and the laws.

I am sure you can decide on the best course of action armed with that information.

The best way to handle asbestos is to not handle it at all and seal it in place or clad over it, sandwiching it with another layer of underlayment and flooring.

Sometimes this isn't possible becasue of deterioration of the framing, subfloor, of existing flooring system.

Unfortunately for you, the Enviromental Protection Agency, state, and local governments have pretty strict laws and regulations in place for Corrective Measures Contractors for tear-out and removal from site, and it usually ends up being shipped back to one of the old asbestos mines for storage.

The EPA has a site for asbestos in the home that you should read completely before deciding on a course of action: http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/ashome.html

I do not know what state you are in, but you should check with your state and local website or call them concerning asbestios removal regulations. I don't think you can jsut put it out for the trash man legally, at least we can't here.

as to your realitor, they probably didnt even know it was there.

sorry I couldnt be more help
 
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Old 12-18-06, 06:41 PM
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Unless I've completely misread your original post that started this thread, You've already removed the Linoleum and are now trying to figure out how to get the tar paper up. Had your questions been posed before removal of the stuff, floorman would be completely correct. Encapsulating it is the least expensive and easiest way to deal with it. Unfortunately, the deed is done so that is no longer an option. You've taken as many steps as you can to remedy any problems created and it seems time to get on with the rest of the job.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 12:37 AM
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I assumed he was talking proper handling, packaging, removal from worksite, disposal of the asbestos containing materials, and testing his home for air quality to ensure it is a safe enviroment.
 
 

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