new floor over old vinyl


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Old 03-08-07, 05:53 AM
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new floor over old vinyl

We have what looks like old commercial grade tile on most of the floors in the house- you know, the colored stuff with flecks in it? It is glued down with black mastic. Both probably both contain asbestos, as I would guess the floors were put down in the 1960s. Do we have to pull up this stuff before laying new flooring over it? We bought some reclaimed wood for a child's room, and our family member says we should pull up the old tileto keep it from becoming loose under the wood. Is this true? TIA!
 
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Old 03-08-07, 03:28 PM
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Obviously it is step saving to do it the way you want to. You have to be sure the old real linoleum floor is good and tight, I guess, before making your call on this. Then if you do this plan, you have to apply the vinyl flooring adhesive with the smallest toothed linoleum trowel and allow it to dry some per manufacturers recomendations. One of the objectives is to eliminate as much of the adhesive's gas before flopping down the new linoleum over the old. What will happen since neither of the two floors breathe very well, there will form air bubbles after you lay the floor. These will not occur right away. Once you lay the floor and roll it good...leave it alone, if you see the air bubbles start to form. These will disappear in a number of days afterwards. But by allowing the notched troweled-on adhesive to dry to that tackiness first, you will cut down on some of that gas formation. Use a 100# roller. You can rent these.

Another method is to lay a floating vinyl floor instead, that requires no glue. I have personally never layed one of these types. They are nice and thick too, and will give you a soft feel when you walk on it. A landlord I do work for just bought a big roll of this, and he is going to be putting it in. I checked it out. He is putting it over a reversed hardboard floor that has a few bad butt joints and other imperfections. But this floating vinyl flooring is I'd say thick enough to make it where noone will notice anything once it is layed.
 
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Old 03-08-07, 05:05 PM
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thanks- but we want to put a wood floor on top of the old vinyl... My concerns are 1) the asbestos factor, and 2) will the old tiles crack underneath the wood floor?
 

Last edited by LeeB; 03-08-07 at 05:07 PM. Reason: forgot to add a few things
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Old 03-09-07, 03:38 PM
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Sorry I didn't follow your post right. Well, if the asbestos is your concern, you could trap it in there by laying asphalt felt paper ontop the old floor first.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 01:22 PM
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thanks- I'll pass this info along to my husband when we start the project.
 
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Old 03-14-07, 02:32 AM
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LeeB,
As you know,asbestos is a dirty word now-a-days! There are only two things that can be done with the original floor. The asbestos can be removed, but it has to be done by a licensed removal expert.

The second way (and recommended by EPA) is encasement. In your case this involves applying a layer of 1/4" plywood sheeting over the entire area, filling the joints with a floor prep solution and laying your vinyl over the top of this. This will have to be done even if you choose to pull up the tile.

Frankly, if you were to remove the asbestos flooring it would cause quite a stir when your trash is picked up!!
 
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Old 03-14-07, 08:37 PM
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Actually asbestos removal does not necessarily need to be performed by a licensed asbestos professional. Many states, most infact, allow for asbestos removal by the homeowner as long as they follow EPA and OSHA guidelines. Some narrow it even further and differentiate between friable and non-friable asbestos removal by the homeowner. You should check your own states guidelines for this. As mentioned disposal is not simply throwing it in the trash.

Having said that, it is very common and accepted practice to lay a new subfloor layer (1/2" ply, CBU etc) over the tile and lay flooring over the new subfloor layer. The biggest issue with adding subflooring layers is the transitional height between rooms, so this needs to be kept in mind. If you are looking at doing a floating floor, then you could lay down a barrier like 6 mil poly or #15 roofing paper and float over that. You could also add a padded barrier or deadener.

I know you are looking at wood flooring but if you were to tile over existing tile you would need to remember that your new floor would only be as good as the one below it.
 
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Old 03-20-07, 05:18 PM
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ugh- I can't even think about it. I will definitely check out our state regulations. I find it hard to believe that this stuff would become airborne, it is so stiff- not dusty. It chips up in large pieces (don't ask me how I know this...). The black mastic is a pain- sticky sticky. It wouldn't be too bad if we could at least remove it ourselves, then figure out how to get rid of it- some sort of haz mat company?

Any ideas on how to find our state regulations??

TIA!!
 
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Old 03-20-07, 07:52 PM
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If you'd like to see some more opinions on the asbestos thing, check out this thread. It was a lively and interesting exchange. http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=294266
 
 

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