Self Adhesive Vinyl Tile with extra Adhesive


  #1  
Old 05-24-07, 12:18 PM
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Question Self Adhesive Vinyl Tile with extra Adhesive

Hello,
I'm going to install vinyl tile over an existing vinyl floor. I plan to do a embosser skim coat the day prior to starting. I'm also going to use an extra adhesive. Previous posts state that I should wait an hour w/fans on it to get it tacky before installing the tiles.
My question is if I skim coat it w/the adhesive and wait an hour can I walk on the adhesive once it's tacky? If I put the adhesive all over the floor am I going to mess it up by walking on it to install the tile? What are your suggestions for dealing w/the tacky adhesive? I'm also supposed to start the tiles in the exact center of the room...how's this supposed to work? I'm so confused!! ;o) Also for the adhesive skim coat do you recommend a small notch or no notch trowel?
Thanks!
Jay
 
  #2  
Old 05-24-07, 03:56 PM
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I'm no expert, but I think that you are not supposed to put your extra adhesive over the entire floor at once - just in an area that you can work in comfortably, and once you have placed tiles in that area, put the adhesive in another section adjacent to that one, and move on....
 
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Old 05-24-07, 04:02 PM
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The glue for vinyl tiles is called clear thin spread. It's spread with a small notch trowel, the same as used in sheet vinyl. It goes down yellowish in color and you won't be able to see the floor through it. As it dries, it starts turning clear and you'll be able to see the floor through it. As soon as it's all clear, YOU'RE all clear to start installing. Do not get on the glue unless you take a lunch with you. You'll be there a while trying to get off it. It gets much more than "tacky". Have the tiles exactly where you want them when you put them down because there's no adjusting. Once you set them in the glue, they don't move willingly. Use a good brand of embossing leveler because the stuff is made for this particular application, sticks very well to the old vinyl, and won't cause problems. It's a bit pricey, but worth it. Don't let someone talk you into using a regular floor patch for this stage of the job. Once the leveler is set up and you've gone back and knocked down any ridges, drips, or missed globs, pop your control lines. Vinyl tiles are a very consistent twelve inches in size. You can use that to figure your layout. The floor should be centered in the room so it looks right, but the starting point doesn't have to be in the center. Get your lay out done as if you were starting in the center and pop one line accordingly. But, after locating the correct placement of the second line, mark the center and then measure in even feet back to the edge of the floor and place the second line so the intersection is in a place you can reach without getting on the glue. After the control tines are down, spread the glue as if you didn't care about the lines. When it dries, you'll be able to see them fine. Once the glue is set up enough, start at this intersection of the two lines and begin installing the tiles. Be very careful that your control lines are exactly ninety degrees of each other and that you place the first tile exactly on the line. This will be your starting point and the rest of the floor will follow what you do here. If you start crooked, you'll end crooked. Stay on the material you've installed as you work. The glue holds it in place very well so your weight won't shift it around. Get a stair step pattern established and then go to town. The stuff goes down pretty fast once you start installing. One little trick; after the first few are down and you have the stair step going, place each tile into it's spot just a little too tight. Not so much that you damage the edges forcing them into the glue, but enough that you have to warp the tile a little to get it in. The glue is somewhat elastic and, once the tile is in place, will want to keep it where it was first placed. If it's placed just a bit too tight, the glue will constantly be drawing the seams together which keeps them tight together and avoids gaps.
 
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Old 05-24-07, 04:59 PM
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Smile Thanks Smokey

Thanks Smokey, I think you really gave me some great advise. I really appreciate it. I figured I had to do a little at a time, but it just seemed like it was going to take for hours that way. But w/your method it should go along pretty quickly.
 
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Old 05-24-07, 07:04 PM
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You're welcome. Have fun and post some "finished" pictures. We like to see the results.
 
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Old 05-25-07, 12:09 PM
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Question Should I use a Roller or not?

Hey I've been reading about Rollers. Should I use a Roller? The Home Depot only has 60lb rollers available. Is that good enough? or should I find a heavier one some place else?
Thanks!
J
 
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Old 05-25-07, 06:42 PM
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Yes, you need to roll it. Most good rental places have heavier ones. Mine is a one twenty five, but most use a seventy five. A sixty may be a bit light. Got any kids who could ride on it? Roll it both ways and don't go too fast. You'll be surprised what a difference it makes in the final outcome.
 
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Old 05-26-07, 06:53 AM
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Question Extra adhesive?

I'm also laying self adhesive vinyl tiles in a kitchen that has sheet vinyl. My situation is a little different though as I'm having to level an uneven floor first. I'll use the roofing shingle/felt technique with quality 1/4" plywood on top. I have to ask why you're using extra adhesive. I did a small area (dormer size) a few years ago, and while it's not a high traffic zone, there has been no lifting of corners or seams at all (I used a rolling pin). Couldn't you just use a drop of seam sealer at each intersecting corner if you're worried about them not staying down? If you do use extra adhesive, you probably would have to do it as you go instead of doing the whole floor ahead of time, like you said, it would be to hard to work the area and I wouldn't think you could walk on it while it was tacky.
A question about my job. I know I'll have to fill nail holes and seams between plywood before laying the tiles, but should I use a latex primer over the plywood before installing the tiles? I have done ceramic tile before and would love to for this project, but the floor leveling is going to raise some areas of the floor where there are transitions to other rooms and I'm afraid ceramic would raise it so much that even reducer strips wouldn't work.
 

Last edited by Jon W.; 05-26-07 at 06:54 AM. Reason: added a new line
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Old 05-31-07, 08:19 PM
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Self-stick vinyl tile

I hope is it OK to ask a question on this thread also.

I am also putting down self-stick vinyl tile. The kitchen floor is currently vinyl tile over particle board over a crawlspace/wood subfloor. There is some water damage. I have scraped up the tile and cut out the damaged (crumbly) areas with a circular saw and patched with plywood. Then I have patched the seams between the plywood patches and the OK-condition particle board with floor patch.

My question is: Is this OK. Can I prime this and then put my tiles down? Or should I add a layer of plywood over this? 1/4" or 1/2 plywood?

Any advice would be appreciated.
 
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Old 06-02-07, 03:39 PM
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aggiette : I tell my customers, "I'll lay it in a snow bank if you want, I just won't guarantee it'll stay there". You can do anything you want, but there are things you shouldn't want to do. I'd put down a quarter inch underlayment if it were my floor. You're bound to have some height differences in all that which can cause the new tiles to break with traffic. With a new layer of floor, you may have a few "rolls" in the floor, but they should be smooth ones that the tile can follow without breaking.
 
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Old 06-02-07, 04:09 PM
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Appreciate the advice.

I had gotten two other opinions (1) that the patching and filling would be sufficient and (2) that I should put a 1/2" plywood over the patch job. Your advice is sort of in the middle---to use a 1/4" plywood over my "repair" job. That would save me some money to use 1/4" plywood if you think that would be sufficient.

Thanks.
 
  #12  
Old 06-02-07, 06:28 PM
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The only reason to go with 1/2 inch is if you need the extra strength because the existing floor has issues.
 
 

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