Floor Lingo


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Old 08-25-07, 06:42 PM
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Floor Lingo

"As a DIY'er it seems to be the most cost effective way to go to get the look of ceramic without the expense of installation. I plan on installing it over 1/4" plywood."

Hello Good Floor People, I am perusing different posts as getting ready to put down new floors. I copied and pasted the above from a post. He states he will install a floor over existing 1/4" plywood. My question is there really 1/4" subfloors out there? It just seems so thin for a sub-floor. Aren't most sub-floors 1/2" and some even 3/4" deep? I have seen this 1/4" subfloor referred in other posts as well. Is he putting more plywood over an existing sub-floor, maybe.

Also, what does VCT mean.
Vinyl _?_Tiles. I will have more questions.

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=297668

Above is a shortcut to the full quote on the forum.
 
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Old 08-25-07, 09:24 PM
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There are 1/4 inch underlayments, but not 1/4 inch subfloors. Many subfloor materials are not suitable surfaces to install various materials to, so the underlayment provides the suitable surface while the actual subfloor provides a portion of the structural strength. In most instances, 1/4 inch plywood is not an approved underlayment. There are materials made specifically for this purpose. So, in answer to one of your questions, yes, he was putting another layer of 1/4 inch material over his existing subfloor. VCT is vinyl composite tile. It's the stuff you see in hospitals, school hallways, commercial kitchens, and so on. It is very durable and relatively inexpensive. Ask any questions you like.
 
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Old 08-26-07, 12:51 PM
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Thank you Smokey for good information. By adding 1/4" plywood to his subfloor, doesn't it, in some cases, make his floor too tall to clear doors, appliances, etc, etc.? To me, underlay is a flexible pad used as a buffer from old to new as well as a noise buffer. It puts some depth down but certainly not a 1/4" depth or does it? Sorry, it is so much easier to ask than to read every post.

Another question, When installing sheet vinyl, can one take the original sub-floor and use a good level quik on it as finished preparation and then continue with a good underlay or pre-underlay(comes with) vinyl?

I will definitely have professionals do any sheet vinyl I lay but I can do any prep ahead for them to ready it up. Question. Will it be the same cost whether I prep it myself or let them do their own preparation? I kind of answered my own question here. If I don't get the prep DO the way they need it, it may cost me more! haha! Thank you for your good info.
 
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Old 08-26-07, 03:10 PM
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Hello Rae, good to hear from you again...

It is difficult for a contractor to guarantee his work if he does not do the entire installation. Proper preparation is a key element to most installations.

It looks like you are leaning toward installing vinyl sheet flooring. 1/4" Luan is a standard underlayment for sheet vinyl. I think the previous post is using the term "plywood" as a catch all, when they mean Luan.

Tell us a little more about what is down on your floor currently that you will be replacing. What is underneath it, etc.
 
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Old 08-26-07, 04:55 PM
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I have sheet vinyl now in kitchen and hallway. It is glued down to floor. It is curled up some at each doorway. I have posted pictures at Photobucket.com I won't start this until this winter sometime. Great indoor winter project. Will have to read up on best way to lift this floor. I bet an ice chipper will dig this up? Is there anyway to trim the curl and fill in with levelquik and install right over the old?

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y84/arcticina/SheetVinylOld000_0013.jpg







http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y84/arcticina/IceChipper000_0007_0001.jpg


Not sure how to make Photobucket open to all? It wants a password. Any suggestions? I will check back here but see you all next week.
 

Last edited by Rae; 08-26-07 at 05:01 PM. Reason: Added last line.
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Old 08-26-07, 10:13 PM
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Photobucket Username: arcticina
Photobucket Password: arcticina (this is a guest
password and same
as username)
 
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Old 08-26-07, 11:37 PM
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If your existing vinyl is well adhered, a new layer can be installed over it with no need of underlayment. But, the existing needs to be well adhered or you'll have problems in short order. The edges that are curling up are typical of vinyl that has nothing holding the edge down. Use a good utility knife and cut the loose edges out, then feather it out with Ardex Feather Finnish or Mapei Planipatch. Go over the entire floor and repair any issues in the same way. Once any peaked seams, tears, or lumps from anything under the vinyl are repaired, you'll need to level the embossed pattern in the existing vinyl. If you don't, the old pattern will telegraph up through the new material. Use a product called embossing leveler to do this. The stuff is made to be spread very thin and will fill in the small impressions made by the embossing process and get you back to a smooth surface.Once all this is done and you're confident you have a good surface to install to, install the new vinyl. Having said all that, if you're hiring this work out, do not help. Vinyl prep work is very similar to the work necessary to paint a new sheet rock wall without texture. The prep work is the job, the paint is just the finishing touch. A good vinyl installer will want to do his own prep work. Improper floor prep can cost hours of work trying to fix it and no installer is happy about time lost. I don't offer any discounts for a customer who wants to help because I don't want them helping, especially with vinyl prep. The floor has to be glass smooth because every little imperfection will show through. The prep is the job, the vinyl is just the finishing touch.
 
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Old 09-01-07, 09:58 PM
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Thanks Czizzi and Smokey. Yes, if I go with sheet vinyl I will let the installer deal with the existing floor. Still pondering.

I will have more questions on other parts of the forum and will add photos to photobucket soon. Thanks for all your help.
 
 

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