Need advice for dealing with Asbestos tiles


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Old 03-03-08, 09:44 PM
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Need advice for dealing with Asbestos tiles

I've been reading up on this topic, and I just got the test results back. I have 9x9 tiles with 5% asbestos. I plan to remodel this room, and I am trying to decide how best to deal with the tiles.

My housemate's dog had some accidents in this room months ago. I ripped out the carpet and found the tiles underneath. I thoroughly wetted the tiles with Nature's Miracle to eradicate the smell. That worked, but some of the tiles became slightly cupped from the moisture. There is also a residual odor from the tarpaper underlayment. A few tiles have small corners that have broken off. Are these edges a risk?

I would like to encapsulate the tiles (and the tarpaper smell) and put down either hardwood or carpet. There are tack strips still in place. Removing the tack strips seems like it could release fibers from the old nail holes.

The last complication is there is slantfin baseboard heat along 2 walls. which would get in the way of new hardwood. One guy said he could cut around it, but that doesn't sound right to me. I suppose itís possible to cut the pipes and raise it up, but thatís a lot more involved. Would an engineered floating floor be able to fit underneath the radiators with adequate clearance?

The tack strip/baseboard complication suggests new carpet. It would be easier and less $$ than wood. What should I use to seal the floor? Self Leveling compound? Ardex? Polyurethane? Kilz? If the tiles were all solidly adhered I wouldn't worry so much, but the cupping is questionable. I don't want them crumbling over time. If necessary, I could probably lift out the ones that are loose and fill the spaces with new tiles.

I presume the subfloor is wood of some kind, so I don't think I can use Bean E Do to remove the cutback if I wanted to remove the tiles (which I really donít)

Thanks in advance for any advice you can share!
 
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Old 03-14-08, 02:10 PM
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Ideally, I would recommend encapsulation with plywood, but your height constraints with the heaters make that problematic for hardwood, so unless you choose carpet or a thin enough lood/laminate, thats out.

depends how much height you have. It is possible a laminate or thin engineered could be used if there is enough clearance under the heaters, then they would clad over the asbestos with no problems ... if you DO have enough height for a laminate or engineered to go under the heaters, then that is probably the most trouble free solution. You could install a 1/4" underlayment fit to the tack strip and pound the tack strip teeth flat and go over it with the engineered or laminate.

another option is carpet and reglue any loose tiles, which would not release any fibers so long as you dont break up, grind, sand, hammer, drill or otherwise disturb the tiles. The existing tackless needs to be solid and in good shape though.
 
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Old 03-14-08, 02:58 PM
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One thing to consider: if any of the tile is left exposed, it may be noted and reported by the buyers home inspector when you sell the house - and the condition/extent of of the remaining ACM will be unknown if it's not visible.

Now, I try to put this in perspective for clients by directing then to the appropriate government web pages, which basically say such tile is not a health hazard unless friable. But there are a certain number of buyers who decided they do not want to take any chances of health risks with ACM, or do not want the financial liability when it comes time for them to sell the house, or both, and that's certainly not an irrational decision.

So you might wish to consider removing the tile now for these reasons.
 
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Old 03-14-08, 05:18 PM
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Thanks to Floorman67 & Michael for your replies :-)

I might try to take up at least the loose and cupped tiles, I presume they will come up easily and cleanly. And they are most likely get cracked and possibly release fibers. Fortunately the glue and underlayment were negative so I don't have to worry about contamination from the more difficult process of cleaning that off.

What would you recommend for removing the tarpaper & cutback? I heard warm water was effective. The advantage of leaving the tiles in place is not having to cope with that messy process. The last thing I want it to have a lot of gooey smelly residue that I can't get off completely.There is one tile which I lifted off, so I can experiment on that area.

Another factor in favor of removal is that disposal of ACM is likely to become more difficult and costly in the future. I know a professional trash hauler, so disposal won't be a problem. I will of course do all the proper double bagging proceedures.

Alternatively, some people have suggested some kind of paintable encapsulant, eg Kilz or Polyurethane, would this adhere to the tiles well enough? The surface is very dull from previous application of Natures Miracle. And it has ben under an old carpet and pad for many years. I was considering using the professional sealants that they use in public buildings with existing tiles. There is a lot of literature online about how to properly strip, seal, and polish VAT for the custodial industry.
 
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Old 03-14-08, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Dunadan View Post
Thanks to Floorman67 & Michael for your replies :-)

I might try to take up at least the loose and cupped tiles, I presume they will come up easily and cleanly. And they are most likely get cracked and possibly release fibers. Fortunately the glue and underlayment were negative so I don't have to worry about contamination from the more difficult process of cleaning that off.

What would you recommend for removing the tarpaper & cutback? I heard warm water was effective. The advantage of leaving the tiles in place is not having to cope with that messy process. The last thing I want it to have a lot of gooey smelly residue that I can't get off completely.There is one tile which I lifted off, so I can experiment on that area.

Another factor in favor of removal is that disposal of ACM is likely to become more difficult and costly in the future. I know a professional trash hauler, so disposal won't be a problem. I will of course do all the proper double bagging proceedures.

Alternatively, some people have suggested some kind of paintable encapsulant, eg Kilz or Polyurethane, would this adhere to the tiles well enough? The surface is very dull from previous application of Natures Miracle. And it has ben under an old carpet and pad for many years. I was considering using the professional sealants that they use in public buildings with existing tiles. There is a lot of literature online about how to properly strip, seal, and polish VAT for the custodial industry.
you need to contact your local government in regards to required removal and disposal regulations and methods.

if your local government has no resources, then check your state.

the Enviromental Protection Agency has strict regulations for removal and disposal, but you want to remain codes compliant on the local and state level as well.

so check local, then state, then federal in that order.
 
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Old 03-15-08, 12:23 PM
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Yup, I've checked on this. ACM tiles can be disposed in my state, provided they are double bagged in the appropriate mil thickness plastic bags, taped securely shut, & labled.
 
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Old 03-16-08, 08:06 PM
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Dunadan,

Here's an outline of a procedure for removing asbestos floor tile from the MN Dept of Public Health, this is the best such document I'm aware of:

Asbestos Floor Tile Removal

Its difficult to print as a web page, so I've mirrored it in printable .pdf format here:

Asbestos Floor Tile Removal (Adobe .PDF format) - Mirror at Paragon Inspections Chicago

Keep in mind that you will have to meet all state and local requirements for asbestos removal and disposal.
 
 

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