1/4" Subfloor on Loose Laid Didn't Work


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Old 12-16-08, 04:44 PM
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1/4" Subfloor on Loose Laid Didn't Work

I put a loose laid linoleum floor down over a 1/4" subfloor that I also installed. The existing floor under that is ~4" tounge and groove plank original I believe to this 100 year old house.

I can't remember if I we used 1/4" plywood (luan?) or masonite (it got torn up about a year ago.)

The problem was that after it was down for about 4 years, it started ripping where the seams in the underlayment were.

Do I need to put down a thicker plywood before reinstalling new loose laid? Or something else?
 
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Old 12-16-08, 09:09 PM
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1/4" plywood underlayment for vinyl is the standard. Patch the seams and holes where countersunk nails/staples. Not sure what you mean by loose lay. There is glue down and perimeter glue down. Perimeter glue down vinyl is not the same as the standard glue down with full spread adhesive. It is a special vinyl product that is glued only along the perimeter. Your local vinyl retailer can point you in the right direction. Follow manufacturer's instructions for installation in order not to void warranties and to achieve a professional install.
 
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Old 12-17-08, 01:38 PM
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Hi,

I meant perimeter glue I guess. I thought there was some linoleum that didn't get any glue and was just held down around the perimeter by quarter round molding.

Is there any placing a slip sheet or rosin paper or tar paper over the seams in the plywood to prevent them from telegraphing through? (The tounge and grove floor is a little wavy or saggy.)
 
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Old 12-17-08, 02:25 PM
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Smile

You should fill and sand smooth any seams and nail/screws so the vinyl will stay flat. Never used a perimeter glue down viny. If the seams/joints are coming loose, it sounds like you didn't have it fastened securely. I like screws instead of nails!
 
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Old 12-17-08, 08:52 PM
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OK, I feel I need to jump in here. First, a little history. The first loose lay vinyls I had anything to do with were produced several years ago and turned out to be a real problem. The only glue they used was on the seams, perimeters, around pipes or heater vent holes, around toilets, and so on. They were a "shrink to fit" product and were advertised to shrink five percent of their mass. We would install the material, it would develop bubbles from the gasses the glue was giving off, but would be laying flat by the next day or some times a couple of days. We thought they were great untill it turned out they never stopped shrinking and would pull out from under base, seams would pull apart, and so on. New glues were developed, new install methods tried, and the whole idea was abandoned. Then, a few years ago, Tarkett came out with a new, "no glue" vinyl that was designed to be installed as a big vinyl throw rug, so to speak. It didn't shrink and used no glue. The seams were taped together underneith with a tape from the manufacturer and then sealed as any other vinyl is. Now, every one and his dog is making the stuff and it's great. Some of it has optional installation methods. It can be full spread glued, perimeter glued, or not glued at all. Some has a fiberglass back, some has a foam cushion back, and others have their own variation. But, many of them can be installed with no glue at all. Consequently, it is quite possible your floor is, indeed, a no glue material. If I were to hazzard a guess as to what caused the problem you experienced, The underlayment may not have been installed correctly. At the underlayment seams, most of these types of materials specify there can be no wider gap between sheets than an eighth of an inch and no more than a sixteenth of an inch lip or step up between sheets. If the underlayment sheets have a more pronounced lip than that, the vinyl will "tear" at the seams in the underlayment. Its sort of like a slow cutting process as the floor is walked on. Theoretically, you're supposed to be able to install over the floor without patching seams and nail holes, but I don't trust that much and always do the prep work anyhow. If your unerlayment is properly installed with a good, smooth finish, your loose lay vinyl should perform well.
 
 

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