Best foor wax


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Old 11-13-10, 01:25 PM
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Best foor wax

I used to use Rubbermaid floor wax on my kitchen floor...it had a great shine to it (although like all floor wax, the shine didn't last long) and I would buy it at Wal Mart.
Seems like they don't carry it anymore, even on line, so I have been through several floor waxes and still can't find one that puts a real shine on my vinyl floor....including some I purchsed on line from janitorial supply web sites...

if anyone know where I could find the Rubbermaid floor wax, I'd appreciate the information...and yes, I tried the Rubbermaid web site...maybe they just don't make it anymore.

If I can't get the Rubbermaid product, maybe some of you have a floor wax you use that are like and mention it here...I'm tired of searching the internet for a floor wax!!

Thanks
 
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Old 11-13-10, 08:52 PM
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I know that Rubbermaid makes a lot of janitorial equipment, but this is the first time I've heard that they actually marketed a floor finish under their own name. I'm wondering if you might be thinking of 3M Scotchgard floor finish instead?

Personally, I like "Carefree" made by the S. C. Johnson Wax Company. The reason why I like it is that it softens up when it gets wet, so that I can scrub off a thicker layer of finish with my floor machine, thereby getting the floor a lot cleaner.

Now, I'm thinking that you probably don't have a $2000 floor machine to MAINTAIN the finish on your kitchen floor, and that you might be better off using an acrylic sealer on your floor instead of a finish.

You should be aware that there are both acrylic "sealers" and floor "finishes" (which I think is what you mean by "wax"). Acrylic finishes are meant to be maintained by using a floor machine to scrub off the dirt embedded surface layer of finish before applying new coats of finish to replace what was scrubbed off. Acrylic sealers are very much harder than finishes, and are not meant to be maintained the way finishes are. Not only are sealers harder, they are very much harder to remove as well.

What I'm thinking is that you might be better off using a sealer on your vinyl floor instead of a floor finish. Because sealers are so much harder than finishes, they don't become embedded with dirt the way finishes do. Basically, they simply wear off, so that when you see that your floor is starting to get dirty in spots, you would clean off the dirt with a wet Magic Eraser, and apply more sealer.

Do you ever strip the "wax" off your kitchen floor? Perhaps if you could tell me what you do prior to applying "wax" to your kitchen floor, I may be able to help you decide how best to maintain it. I like to think I know a little bit about maintaining floor finishes, but I'll leave that for you to decide.
 
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Old 11-14-10, 10:02 AM
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Nestor,
Thanks for your reply. The Rubbermaid product I used was from Wal Mart, they kept it in a section with other Rubbermaid products (it was in a yellow 1 gallon jug)...I'm 99% certain it did say Rubbermaid on the jug...but, guess that's water under the bridge.
My floor is not top of the line...we live on our farm, so it does get dirty pretty fast, and we have 3 dogs that also put scratches in the floor...so it's a huge chore keeping it looking nice.
I had no clue there was a difference in waxes as you explained it...finishes and sealers...and I would think a sealer would be best for me to use, might keep the scratches down at any rate, and look shiney longer. I've gone through several brands of floor 'wax'...from the brands you buy in places like Wal Mart, to a couple I ordered on line from janitorial supplies...one was 'Armstrong Shine Keeper Floor Finish', the other from 'Concrete Camoflage-Top Shine High Traffic Acrylic Wax'...both looked dull when I was done.
I usually wash the floor first with a no rinse cleaner, this last time, when I used the Top Shine, it was suggested I use Simple Green to wash the floor...so I did.
I don't have any type of buffer machine, can't afford one, so I use 'elbow grease'...the floor is about 4 years old, and I know it needs to be stripped...I have a very bad back & neck, so can't strip the floor myself, I know it's a huge job, unless I'm mis informed about that...I could probably hire someone to come in and strip it...we have a local cleaning company that does that sort of work...I assume you recommend the floor be stripped?
So, now I guess I'll wait for your next reply and see what you suggest...have the floor stripped? Then what brand of sealer I should use and how to maintain the floor afterwards...
I appreciate your help very much. Thanks!!
 
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Old 11-14-10, 01:17 PM
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Fdf47:

Well, my advice would be to use a sealer instead of a floor finish. Floor finishes are softer, and meant to be maintained. Normally, that's done by using a floor machine like this one:



Since dirt gets embedded in the surface of the finish underfoot, the normal procedure is to use a blue pad and a floor machine to scrub the top surface of the floor finish off, and then mop new finish on to replace what was scrubbed off. I own a small apartment block, and I do this in apartments when they're empty.

In your case, you have no way of maintaining a floor finish other than periodically stripping it off and putting new finish down. In a case like that, I'm thinking it would be better to use a sealer rather than a finish. Sealers are much harder, and are intended to be put down before the finish to protect the vinyl from stains. And, of course, you don't strip a sealer off, you simply clean the floor where the sealer has worn off (using a Magic Eraser) and put more sealer on.

Now, you CAN get a shiney floor using a sealer if you use enough of it. When you want to spruce up your floor, you would clean the floor using a Magic Eraser and simply mop on more sealer.

To remove sealer, you would use any stripper meant for floor finish, but use it undiluted. You just let the stripper sit on the sealer for 10 or 15 minutes and then scrape the sealer off with a SHARP paint scraper. Janitorial companies will also remove the sealer from a floor using something called a "high productivity pad" on a floor machine. A high productivity pad is basically a nylon pad that is VERY aggressive to basically scratch the sealer off the floor. I know a high productivity pad won't harm vinyl composition floor tiles, but it might harm soft sheet vinyl flooring.

You'd probably want to strip the floor finish you have on your floor off before putting sealer on. However, if you go to any Home Depot that rents tools, you can rent floor machines like the one pictured above. It takes a few minutes to learn how to use a floor machine, but it would make quick work of stripping your old floor finish off. And, of course, you would need a wet/dry vaccuum cleaner to pick the stripped finish off the floor.

Personally, I like a sealer called "First Down" made by the Buckeye Company. All of my apartments have sheet vinyl flooring in the bathrooms, and I use First Down over those sheet vinyl floors to prevent them from getting stained.

As far as stripping your existing finish off, you don't necessarily need to be doing a lot of bending over for that. Every places listed under "Janitorial Equipment & Supplies" in your yellow pages will sell a tool called a "doodle bug pad holder" like the one shown below:



You can buy doodle bug pad holders with ordinary handles, and suitable for mounting on a pole, like the one shown. And, of course, you can buy every kind of pad for a doodle bug that you can for a floor machine.



Doodle bugs are often used to strip the wax off in corners of rooms (where the floor machine can't get into) and in tight spots (like under radiators and anywhere else that a floor machine can't get into.

It's perfectly feasible to strip floor finish off a floor using nothing more than a doodle bug pad holder mounted on a pole and a black nylon pad. You'd also need a wet/dry vaccuum cleaner with a squeegee nozzle to pick the stripped wax off the floor.

I rarely strip the wax off the vinyl composition tile floors in my apartments. I simply scrub the dirty surface layer off with my floor machine, and apply a new coat of finish. However, when I do need to strip off damaged floor finish (say if it's scratched up or otherwise damaged), I normally just use a doodle bug to do it with. With a doodle bug pad holder, a pole and a wet/dry vaccuum cleaner with a squeegee nozzle, you could still use floor finish instead of sealer, and periodically strip the floor finish off your floors to maintain them.

But, stripping off the finish and applying sealer is also a feasible option that would be a lot less work.
 
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Old 11-14-10, 02:09 PM
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Thanks so much...you did help and I have jotted down the highlights of your post...think I'll be buying a Doodle Bug!!
Appreciate all the time you put in the help me...thank you.
 
 

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