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Is Baseboard too high? Options? Installing Vinyl Planks today. Time sensitive.

Is Baseboard too high? Options? Installing Vinyl Planks today. Time sensitive.


  #1  
Old 09-17-11, 02:55 AM
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Question Is Baseboard too high? Options? Installing Vinyl Planks today. Time sensitive.

Hello.

I'm ready to install Allure's "Floating Resilient Plank Flooring" and am not sure what to do about the state of my floor molding. 3/4 of the baseboard is 1/2 inch off of the floor while the rest is touching the floor.

If I installed it now I'd have a lot of space between the baseboard. The planks are 0.15 inches (according to Home Depot's website).

What would be the best way to proceed?

Would quarter round molding be the best option? The baseboard in the room is 2 inches or so; it's very plain.

The only other options I know are to re-install the molding or install the flooring the way it it is.

I'd rather not have to rip it out but am willing to give it a try if it's the best way to go. I spent a long time sanding and painting it.

I was going to install the flooring last night but ran into this issue. I'm installing them today as soon as I know the best way to proceed or if this is even a big issue.

[Edit: How would using quarter round molding work? It would be going wayy under the molding in some area and in the others it would be up to the baseboard. It would be hard to position the flooring 1/8 inch from the wall if I can't see it.]
 

Last edited by Skeeter505; 09-17-11 at 03:20 AM. Reason: added question
  #2  
Old 09-17-11, 04:09 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

IMO shoe molding looks better than quarter round. Shoe mold is just as tall as quarter round but not as wide. The molding is somewhat flexible so it will follow any minor waves in the floor or wall. Prime and apply the 1st coat of enamel to the molding before you install it.
 
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Old 09-17-11, 04:28 AM
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Go ahead with the installation. As Marksr stated, shoe molding is 3/4" tall and 1/2" deep and looks much better than quarter round (3/4 x 3/4"). If your largest crack is 1/2", then the shoe molding should work. HOWEVER, IMO if the house is older and the base is not very decorative, quarter round will look more to the period of construction.
 
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Old 09-17-11, 04:45 AM
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This is helpful and I'll be checking out shoe molding as well. The house was built in the 70's so it's very plain and not decorative at all. It's pretty much the entire room that is placed 1/2 above. The baseboard on the longest wall is touching the floor (or close to it in some areas)

Will it look uneven since part of the baseboard is 1/2 higher than the other? I guess I'll find out haha.

Also, something I'm not sure on. Do I install the flooring under the baseboard near where it hits the wall or do I leave it 1/8 inch from the molding like I'll be doing on the molding that is touching the floor. I'm guessing I go all the way under since it's a "floating floor".

Thank you both for your advice!!
 
  #5  
Old 09-17-11, 06:38 AM
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I would stop "at" the vertical plane of the baseboard, giving you space under it. Your shoe or quarter round molding will cover over it. Remember, too, since it is a floating floor, nail the shoe/quarter into the baseboard and not into the flooring. With 1/2" gap, you will take up another 1/8" with the flooring, so you really will have 3/8" to deal with, which is half the height of the shoe/quarter, giving you enough base to nail into. I would purchase or rent a brad nailer with 1 1/2" brads to attach the shoe. Much faster, sets the nails and no wobble of the wood.
Oh yeah, your baseboard is level, so the shoe will hide the aberration of it looking odd. I believe you have structural failing underneath where it has sunk, therefore the gap.
 
 

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