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1975 home, sheet vinyl asbestos back+glue; plywood + new sheet vinyl

1975 home, sheet vinyl asbestos back+glue; plywood + new sheet vinyl

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Old 11-24-11, 10:59 PM
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Question 1975 home, sheet vinyl asbestos back+glue; plywood + new sheet vinyl

Hi, new member and first post. I read all I could on various flooring and on sheet vinyl here, and have specific questions I didn't see answers to. Thanks for any help. (P.S. I read how ceramic tile was better to go with on any day than sheet vinyl, but I'll ask about sheet and if you have suggestions about your preference for ceramic tile, add them.)

I'm sorry if I give too much backstory, but I don't know which particulars help you to answer, so here goes.

1. Small house, cabin type, sheet vinyl sample tested positive for asbestos. Decided to have plywood as an underlayment for the new sheet vinyl rather than pay for abatement to have old vinyl removed [(Reason: I didn't want cabinets removed for abatement process nor the first layer of plywood of old floor removed which would be required even if under cabinets is vinyl free (I haven't removed moulding yet, so don't know if vinyl is under cabinets). ....the house was a builder's first and he lived in it while he built subsequent houses, so maybe he laid vinyl first then built cabs to make it easier for himself to lay the sheet, though I'm told usually the vinyl is last to go in after the cabs to have less chance of messing up the vinyl floor, so maybe the asbestos tile isn't under the cabinets too, but even if not, the first layer of plywood would be removed in abatement, cutting it out to the cabinets, and so covering with plywood seems less of an upheaval)]. Any comments about asbestos or choice of plywood to cover?

2. We have a cabinet/desk built-in for the kitchen that is ready for installation due to the slow-up with vinyl install b/c of finding asbestos, the testing, getting estimates and explanations about abatement, etc. So cabinetmaker said don't go greater than 1/8-inch plywood b/c his measurements weren't taken with consideration for added plywood height to the floor. I believe plywood will be a solution to the asbestos by containing it, but will 1/8 inch ply be thick enough under the cushioned sheet vinyl (BTW, the cost is, per sq foot, $26 for vinyl + $7.50 for installation), or is 1/4 inch required as a minimum underlayment?

3. Does the plywood need to be painted with primer before it is used as an underlayment?

4. Does urethane sealed sheet vinyl off-gas for very long after the install? The installer said he'd open it up at the warehouse to air for a few days to lessen any smell, which he said was minimal, if I wanted him to [he's a considerate, easy-to-work with fellow, and the job is small plus 'it's vinyl' , as one poster said in another thread].

5. Does sheet vinyl need to sit at the home for a few days before installation within a specific temperature range (I heat with a wood stove but have electric oil-filled heaters too and can manage this)? I've been reading everywhere to understand the product, about which I've found not much.

6. This is to be a 1-day job I'm told, 2 rooms, 37 sq yards total; do you think 1 day? If I want to spiff up the floor moulding, I'll have to be quick about it, which is why I will try to remove it myself, plus I'm curious as to how much of the floor is covered with the old vinyl.

7. I was told by several people (in the business and not) that cork flooring isn't hearty enough for a 35-pound outside-inside romping dog, cat claws, and a dirt walkway between car and home plus 2 people with street shoes on inside, but I watched a home show contractor who installed cork flooring and the caption of that segement said cork was durable enough for commercial use and house magazine listed it as durable in a comparison table with other flooring. (Maybe my use is harder than commercial use would be.) Is cork flooring hardier than most people think or not? This would be in the kitchen, not the bathroom.

8. Is there a wider profit margin for sheet vinyl compared to other flooring?

Because we're doing several projects, I'll have questions for other forums; but flooring education is my most time-sensitive need. Thank you.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 07:31 AM
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1/4" underlayment grade plywood is normally used. Do not use luan. Do not primer it. The vinyl you are using is very soft. Do not use roller chairs or anything that regularly rolls on it. It will void the warranty. The vinyl does not ned to acclimate. The odor wll dissipate rapidly.





40 years installing flooring
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:06 AM
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Correction: "..don't go greater than 1/8-inch plywood". It s/b 1/4 inch, I checked back this a.m. with him, and he said he could make adjustments if it is greater, so I have leeway with height of plywood. Thanks.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:37 AM
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Thank you, and thanks for the heads up! Damage from the big comfy desk chair with casters wouldn't be covered. Also it seems from what you say that damage from the chair would be a certainty in due time. I could put a large plastic chair mat (one w/o spikes of course) under it. I found the warranty online and read it...better now than never . Thanks for the forum. The warranty is at Flexitecvinyl Residential . I naively thought a 15-year warranty meant the vinyl could withstand a stampede whereas a 5 yr or 10 yr warrantied vinyl wouldn't, esp since I was told cork wouldn't hold up, but vinyl would. Plus the very old vinyl we have now has withstood 28 years of dogs and us, but probably wasn't cushioned.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 10:41 AM
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Thumbs up Moulding stops at cabinets, yea!

Also, we removed the moulding and the old vinyl doesn't go under the cabinets, yea!
 
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Old 11-26-11, 08:35 AM
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IMHO, the old felt backed vinyls are a better product.





flooring installer for 40 years
 
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Old 12-02-11, 12:26 PM
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Question Tool to pull up ply (with asbestos vinyl intact)? Cut to 2nd layer w handsaw?

Change in direction:
Remove old vinyl layer.
Install marine plywood for underlayment? and felt-back sheet vinyl probably, not cushioned.


Hi, we've removed the moulding to see where the plywood stops or doesn't stop in order to see the steps needed to remove the old vinyl; then we will hire for install of underlayment plywood and sheet vinyl. The top layer of plywood floor stops at the kitchen cabinets, but in the bathroom, it continues under combined sink/countertop/lower cabinets and under a corner built-in cabinet.

I bought the product, Your Last Coat, from Global Encasement at encasement.com because it encapsulates asbestos fibers, making removal of the vinyl-mastic/plywood safer. Our square footage of old vinyl is less than 160 square feet*, so we are allowed to do the work, and I have contacted an abatement company who will handle the landfill disposal lawfully and give me a landfill receipt for our refuse, after we properly double wrap it in 6-mil plastic (I'll reread the law first to be sure 6 mil) and double tape it and label it with our address, warning, etc. I'd use amended water too to wet everything down, again to control any fiber escape, after YLC is applied where I can apply it. This is a use-the-greatest-of-care-as-you-go project. (An abatement company gave a $2,400 estimate, removing the first layer of plywood; $2400 is probably the minimum job price the company can afford to take.)

I want to use marine plywood (if I can find it) for the new underlayment to avoid urea-formaldehyde adhesive of interior plywood (and I suppose in underlayment plywood?). I agree with using felt-backed instead of cushioned, due to the heavy refrigerator and upright freezer and the heavy desk chair with casters and the kitchen chairs (though we'll use furniture resters and the adhesive would be full cover).

Okay, the ?:
I have a large metal puller that I used to pull the moulding off. Is there a best tool for pulling up the top layer of plywood? I understand from reading doityourself forums that there will be staples to pull out of the bottom plywood layer (a fellow told us glue might have been applied to avoid squeaky floor, and if so, I hope the 2 layers can be separated w/o hurting the bottom layer??)

In the bathroom, the top layer of plywood continues under the lower cabinets (w/o vinyl attached). I need to check with Global to be sure, but I believe after I apply Your Last Coat in the bathroom around the cabinet where the vinyl ends that I can cut the first layer with a handsaw slowly (to keep disturbance low key) and then remove the top layer of plywood with vinyl attached.

Jump in anywhere here at these see-as-I-go plans for pulling and sawing. Rolled-eyes icons are okay, b/c I know I have kindergarten experience. I want to listen and learn.

Will there be a detrimental effect to the bathroom floor to have the plywood under the sink/countertop/cabinets no longer extended to the walls (less weight/force distribution)? It is secured to the layer under it, but I wondered. And it will abut the new underlayment plywood layer after its install.

*The sheet vinyl installer was buying much more than this to prevent seams in laying out the kitchen and bathroom, if I understand how it is to be done.

Thanks for your comments. I've been reading when I can while working the day job (not in construction obviously), so progress is slow. The YLC should arrive by Monday or Tuesday.

Any how-to links are appreciated. Thanks for the vinyl install links I found at doityourself forums.

Cheers!
 
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