Need Advice on Best Way to Install Sheet Vinyl over Asphalt

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Old 01-17-12, 12:16 AM
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Need Advice on Best Way to Install Sheet Vinyl over Asphalt

Greetings Gurus!

I am in need of some advice for an upcoming project I took on at work.
Here's the situation...

The company I work for maintains a satellite location at a local open-air market type of place (it's a glorified swapmeet... ) The space we occupy there is a 24'x24' area of asphalt enclosed and covered by thick white tarp material. Moisture really isn't a factor here in Arizona so hopefully that won't play into the situation too much.
Anyway, we occupy this booth year-round and the boss decided he wants to completely revamp the space including the installation of this sheet vinyl he saw and fell in love with. I can't remember the brand at the moment but it's quite thick and looks like Travertine tile. As I mentioned, the ground is asphalt and currently has square, interlocking foam pieces over the asphalt which is pretty comfortable to stand and walk on due to the thickness and sponginess of the foam pieces.
The TT&L's stipulate that no part of a vendor's structure, display or flooring may be permanently affixed, attached or fastened to the property they rent. So, taking that into consideration, I would appreciate your suggestions and advice on:
A. What, if anything should be used as a suitable underlayment to attach the sheet vinyl to. (I had originally thought staggering sheets of OSB would work...)
B. Is it realistic to believe this type of flooring is suitable and/or durable enough to withstand the environment and the elements to which it will be exposed - namely, the summer heat (although it will never receive any direct sunlight. The edge along one side will be exposed to moisture when it rains but will dry out within hours of it raining.)
C. If we've gotten past the hurdles proposed above and that type of product and application is viable, what's the best product/method of securing/attaching the sheet product to the underlayment if it's wood... PVC... whatever.

I appreciate you for taking the time to read my entire post (long as it is...) and thank you in advance for your replies/suggestions.

Regards,
Steve
Chandler, AZ
 
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Old 01-17-12, 07:56 AM
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You said this material is quite thick. Define "thick". Commercial grade sheet vinyl is normally quite thick, but normally comes six feet wide. Many fiberglass backed sheet vinyls are also quite thick and come twelve wide. The commercial is also quite stiff where the fiberglass backed is very pliable. If he's looking at the commercial, tell him to fall in love with something else. In the situation you describe, it won't be a great idea. If it's fiberglass backed, it might actually work. That stuff is made to be installed with no glue so you wouldn't be attaching it to the existing surface. The issue is going to be in keeping the underlayment you put down from moving around under the vinyl. I use 1/4 inch underlayment, but that won't be sufficient in your case. I don't build floors, I just cover them so I don't know what sort of material is available. If there is something half inch or better that will lock together or if you can somehow fasten the material together you end up using so it acts as one sheet without actually being attached to the existing, loose lay sheet vinyl would be the way to go. It will get intensely hot in that glorified tent in the summer, but without being directly subjected to the sun, it might not be a problem. Ask your supplier to talk to the tech department of the manufacturer to get a more educated opinion. I spent four of the longest years of my life in Phoenix and they kept telling me not to worry about it, I'd get used to the heat. That's like telling a chicken in the oven it's going to get used to the heat.
 
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Old 01-17-12, 11:13 PM
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Hi Smokey,

Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
You said this material is quite thick. Define "thick"....
.10 in. is what is listed on the sample. I have no idea what the avg. thickness is for sheet vinyl but to me, this seems thicker than the last vinyl I worked with which was many years ago.

Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
Commercial grade sheet vinyl is normally quite thick, but normally comes six feet wide. Many fiberglass backed sheet vinyls are also quite thick and come twelve wide. The commercial is also quite stiff where the fiberglass backed is very pliable.
I'm assuming the one he chose is commercial because the biggest reason for the revamp is the appearance/condition of the current floor covering which didn't even last a year - and it wasn't commercial grade. However, based on the info you suggested, it may not be since the sample I've got is very pliable and supple - and it's rubber backed. Hell... I don't know!!! LOL!
Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
If he's looking at the commercial, tell him to fall in love with something else.
LMAO!! Yeah... that's EXACTLY what I'll do!! LOL!

Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
That stuff is made to be installed with no glue so you wouldn't be attaching it to the existing surface.
I was pretty surprised when I learned that fact. Apparently this stuff has "pressure release...?" or something to that effect - it has its own adhesive properties which keeps it in place but can be removed without difficulty when it's time.
Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
The issue is going to be in keeping the underlayment you put down from moving around under the vinyl. I use 1/4 inch underlayment, but that won't be sufficient in your case. I don't build floors, I just cover them so I don't know what sort of material is available. If there is something half inch or better that will lock together or if you can somehow fasten the material together you end up using so it acts as one sheet without actually being attached to the existing, loose lay sheet vinyl would be the way to go. It will get intensely hot in that glorified tent in the summer, but without being directly subjected to the sun, it might not be a problem.
I talked to a buddy of mine today about this and he suggested I use these clips which are made for the specific purpose of joining 4x8 sheets together and keeping them from traveling, so I'm going to check those out tomorrow when I go to the BigBox with my list. He made the same recommendation as you regarding the thickness of the underlayment. He also suggested that in addition to covering the entire area with whatever I end up using as my vapor barrier, I roll Henry's rubber roof coating on the outer pieces of plywood as a mastic and actually wrap the entire sheet in the vapor barrier material. Seems like overkill to me, but if I knew the answers I wouldn't be here asking for advice and guidance, right?
The supplier is literally right next door to where I work so I'm going to stop in tomorrow and chat with them to glean as much as I can from them.
Originally Posted by Smokey49 View Post
I spent four of the longest years of my life in Phoenix and they kept telling me not to worry about it, I'd get used to the heat. That's like telling a chicken in the oven it's going to get used to the heat.
LOL! Well.... what can I say? It's true though... you do actually acclimate - eventually. That's not to say with acclimation comes enjoyment or even complacency with it, no. I've lived here for 25 years and by mid July, I whine and bicth and complain about the heat as much as the next guy - especially when it's the 28th or 35th or 42nd day in a row over 110 degrees. It definitely wears on you. But, you get used to it after a while and learn not to touch certain things at certain times of the day after being burned enough times. The trade-off is the months like this one when it's blizzarding in some parts of the country but it was sunny and 72 deg. here today. Nice!

Thanks so much for your quick reply and the great info & suggestions. I'm planning to photograph this project every step of the way because I have this sneaking suspicion it's going to look so good compared to all the other vendors' flooring choices, I'm going to pick up quite a bit of side work as a result and I'll use the pics as a sales tool. I'll definitely keep this thread updated with my progress and the pics, if for no other reason than it may be useful to someone else down the road. God knows, I searched extensively for this exact situation and came up with nothing.

Regards,

Steve
 
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