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Is it safe to install base cabinets on top of vinyl plank flooring

Is it safe to install base cabinets on top of vinyl plank flooring

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  #1  
Old 12-01-14, 03:31 PM
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Is it safe to install base cabinets on top of vinyl plank flooring

Hello everyone,

I am preparing to remodel our whole kitchen and have a question about the floor I plan to install. I am planning to install Traffic Masture Allure vinyl plank floor (Link).

I've read the directions and it seems pretty easy, but I have a couple of concerns.

The instructions specify not to install permanent cabinets on top of the floor as this will prevent the floor from expanding/contracting and could cause issues down the road. Does anyone have any experience with installing this type of floor and will installing the cabinets directly over the vinyl cause issues long-term?

I plan to gut the kitchen and want to just do a clean install as the last step before installing any cabinets, counter, etc. instead of doing the base cabinet install, then do the floor around.

Also, the instructions specify that the vinyl should not be install where temps get below 55F or above 85F. I live in Philadelphia and we can get some cold winters and hot summers. Does the usual northeast weather pose a risk long-term?

I decided on Vinyl over Laminate for ease of install, water resistance and durability. Laminate was my first choice, but water resistance is important to me. Wood, engineered wood, tile and other flooring selections wasn't appealing to my liking or budget for this project.

Thanks and let me know if you have any questions.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:04 PM
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I would not set my lowers on the vinyl plank. Although I recommend doing it on ceramic tile, your flooring must move and will buckle once it sees it can't move.

The instructions specify not to install permanent cabinets on top of the floor as this will prevent the floor from expanding/contracting and could cause issues down the road.
There would be no one that I know of that has good experience doing it otherwise. It will cause problems long term.

Just because the outside temperatures get below 55f or above 85f, is not indicative of the inside temperatures of your house, is it??

Glad you decided on the plank over laminate. Laminate is at the bottom of the food chain, IMO.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:07 PM
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No floor under cabinets. This goes for any type of flooring, although not always for the same reasons.
It's harder to install, I know, by cutting around the cabinets but you want to do it right.

I'll leave the temp ranges to someone else. I'm not sure on that. Seems flooring would be useless if you can't use it in half the country.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:09 PM
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Make sure that you follow installation instructions exactly. There have been a lot of complaints about Allure.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 09:38 PM
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Take the time to use the search function on this or any other DIY site with the key word "Allure" most will have at 1000 post on this one subject.
It's no where near as easy to install as they make it seem.
I could have had a quality linoleum installed by a pro faster and cheaper.
It also would not have seams every few inches.
You will also notice a smell for about a week, sort of smells like fresh latex paint.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 11:07 AM
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Thanks. I searched the forum prior to posting, but not for allure and searching for reviews, but for similar experiences with installation in the kitchen. I'm fine with doing the install and not installing under cabinets.

Is it safe to install under the refrigerator, stove and dishwasher? Or leave open and level with 3/16" luan underpayment board?

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 11:14 AM
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I looked at Linoleum (sheet vinyl) and found that it is comparable in price, but I am a DIY'er and am not trying to add extra cost by having a contractor do the install. This is why I went with the vinyl plank.

Is linoleum superior than vinyl plank?
 
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Old 12-02-14, 12:12 PM
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Underlayment would be 1/4" thick.
Luan is no longer an acceptable as an underlayment for vinyl products, voids in the core, color bleed through, cause glues to release are a few reasons.
You should be using 1/4 subfloor rated plywood, also called Muliti ply.
I have some linoleum floors that have been in rentals that are 20 years old and still look as good as new.
The one kitchen I have that has Allure has seams opening up, and some places that will just not stop buckling even those there's plenty of room for expansion.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 12:23 PM
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We switched from sheet vinyl to ceramic in our units about 10 years ago because we could install the ceramic ourselves and that was cheaper than someone installing the sheet vinyl for us.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 01:55 PM
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I can do ceramic tile, but just did not want to deal with the cold floors in the winter. I know the floors can be heated, but add to that the cost, plus the slippery factor, grout, cement board and the costs go up. Also, the risk of cracking and difficult repairs. I'm not knocking ceramic, it just doesn't fit with the ease of installation and cost savings am looking for. I am actually reconsidering vinyl plank flooring and thinking about vinyl sheet flooring.

From a costs perspective, this seems to be on par with my budget. For house resale value, the kitchen remodel will add to the value although the floors are a major part, I'll take the plunge for the inexpensive floors.

Now, I'll be researching installing vinyl sheet flooring. What is the major concerns that warrants an installer?

If I can do this myself, I would rather.

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 02:42 PM
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I'll leave the installation to the guys that do it often. I just wanted to comment the new vinyl floors are not the ones of old. I've recently seen vinyl sheet floors in homes that I would have swore were tile. Very nice looking floor.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 02:42 PM
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Now, I'll be researching installing vinyl sheet flooring. What is the major concerns that warrants an installer?
Cutting it accurately. Why did you pull back from the Allure planks? They are not a bad product. Some folks may have complaints, but doesn't everyone? The vinyl planks will be more DIY friendly than any sheet goods.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 02:48 PM
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I'm not crazy about vinyl, mainly because you have to cut it accurately - if you make a mistake, you may have ruined the entire sheet. A dummy like me can handle little 1' squares ... and if I mess one up it's no big deal to toss it and get another piece. Same thing for planks and tiles. IMO vinyl installation is best left for the pros ..... but it can be a diy job - just not for me if I can get out of it
 
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Old 12-02-14, 04:05 PM
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Why did you pull back from the Allure planks?
Keeping the allure floors for now. Just doing some research to see if the vinyl sheet would be better, but it seems for a DIY project, I should stick with vinyl planks.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:25 PM
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Sheet vinyl, like Flexitec is very DIY friendly. Any installer will tell you that the most likely part of a vinyl floor to fail are the seams. With Allure or any vinyl plank, you have a seam every few inches. Halstead has not been very good about taking care of customer complaints, even though they admitted that some were defective. As a pro installer, I will not install allure.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 06:31 PM
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If you do go with Allure, put down plywood (use plywood that is the same thickness as the Allure) where your cabinets will go, so that the vinyl planks can go around the cabinets. (Otherwise you may have trouble getting a dishwasher under your countertop) Base shoe moulding will cover all your edges if you have correctly measured where the plywood needs to go and where the cabinets will sit.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 11:51 AM
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Slightly different question, does anyone have any experience with vinyl plank interlocking versus the grip strip?

Since I have time before staring the project, I just want to have the best/easiest/issues free flooring. I'm still holding onto the grip strip flooring I have now, since I bought it on sale, but considering my options.

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 03:26 PM
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The newer Allure with the interlock is billed to be more impervious to water damage than the sticky tab version. I tried to interlock two pieces while in the store the other day and found it very difficult to do. As it turns out, if the flooring is laying flat, the interlock works just fine. It was too floppy to do handheld. I have not installed the interlock yet, but it looks pretty straight forward.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 08:18 AM
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Thanks again for all the responses and guidance. I will be returning the vinyl plank flooring and I will switch to ceramic. I found two nice wood-look tiles from Lowes at less than a dollar per 6x20 tile. One is a walnut and one is pecan. We are settling on an expresso color cabinet with light granite counter and I think the lighter tile might work, but the darker would too.

Even though I said I didn't want to do Ceramic, I think this will be a better choice. Mainly because it is easy to install and as cost effective as well.

I will do a wall to wall install so the cabinets and appliances are level. I'll post a new question in the ceramic section for my continued questions.

Thanks again and I'll try to remember to post pics when the project is completed.
 
 

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