New bathroom flooring, install first or last?


  #1  
Old 01-18-23, 09:36 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 143
Upvotes: 0
Received 3 Upvotes on 3 Posts
New bathroom flooring, install first or last?

Have a new built and installing "rigid core 12"x24" snap lock planks" in my bathroom, I believe it is vinyl. Can I install the flooring first then put my toilet and vanity on top? I hear pros and cons doing it both ways, some say install flooring first but don't screw the vanity to the floor, only to the wall, so the floor can expand and contract, some say never put a toilet and vanity on a floating floor, not sure which is the correct way...
 
  #2  
Old 01-18-23, 10:54 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 29,652
Received 1,644 Upvotes on 1,472 Posts
The toilet goes on top of the flooring, the flooring should really go around the vanity but you can also set it on top. Flooring butts up to the tub or shower curb. I have never heard of anyone screwing a vanity to the floor. A bathroom is typically small enough that it won't cause any expansion / contraction problems when these items are on top. If the vanity was already in place you would go around it.

Only problem putting the vanity on top will cause is when you want to replace the floor someday. So that might be a reason to go around it.
 
marksr voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 01-20-23, 05:36 AM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,089
Received 29 Upvotes on 24 Posts
Caulking around a stool does no good at all. It won't prevent anything.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 01-18-23, 11:10 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
Only problem putting the vanity on top will cause is when you want to replace the floor someday. So that might be a reason to go around it.
Actually, I find it just the opposite. If flooring is cut around the vanity, if and when a vanity needs replacing it may not fit the flooring cut out. And if the vanity has a countertop with a separate sink, lifting that vanity up and out may be a problem. Similar to an under-counter dishwasher in the kitchen. You want to be able to slide the unit out.
I have found that if replacing a bathroom floor, the chances are the cabinets will be replaced or taken out first then floor laid, and cabinet placed back in.
On all my bathroom remods, I have always brought the flooring right up to and flush as possible to the toilet flange. It always looks better if a flooring appears to go all the way under an object.
 
  #5  
Old 01-19-23, 06:35 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 143
Upvotes: 0
Received 3 Upvotes on 3 Posts
If I run my flooring around the toilet flange I'll be about a 1/4" lower than the flooring, should I put a extender spacer on the top of the toilet flange to raise it a little higher above the flooring?
 
  #6  
Old 01-19-23, 06:48 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 29,652
Received 1,644 Upvotes on 1,472 Posts
I would use an extension, yes. Be sure you seal between the extension and the flange.
 
  #7  
Old 01-19-23, 07:05 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
Yes, most defiantly use a flange riser. Or at least make the flange level with the floor surface.
 
  #8  
Old 01-19-23, 07:11 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
On another note, do not caulk around the toilet after installation. I know it's not to code and not allowed in a public place. But at home, if you have a leak or failed wax seal, you want to know about it ASAP, before it ruins the subflooring.
 
  #9  
Old 01-19-23, 07:28 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,398
Received 722 Upvotes on 633 Posts
It's standard practice to caulk the front and sides of the commode. Leaving the back uncaulked allows a leak to exit letting you know you have a problem.
 
  #10  
Old 01-19-23, 08:16 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
Marksr, yes, I realize that. But a leak from the back side of a toilet is not always noticeable until perhaps several days s later. And if the floor is slightly unlevel, you may never see that leak until it's too late. Just how often to you actually look behind a toilet?
At home I have never caulked all around the toilet and it looks just fine. That might beg the question about dirt and mold forming under the toilet. Ordinary cleaning and housekeeping do not cause those problems. On the toilets that I've had to remove, the flooring was not dirty or moldy. Discolored, yes (actually it had the original color that was not faded).
 
  #11  
Old 01-20-23, 05:46 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
But it's actually required by the International Plumbing Code to caulk a toilet to the floor.


With that said I still won't do it!
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 01-20-23 at 06:25 AM. Reason: No links to other diy sites
  #12  
Old 01-20-23, 08:09 AM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,089
Received 29 Upvotes on 24 Posts
Never saw one get caulked in the 45 years I installed flooring. It does no good at all. Just is hard to keep clean.
 
  #13  
Old 01-20-23, 08:45 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 11,575
Received 648 Upvotes on 573 Posts
Sam, I don't disagree, but it's required in hospitals and public places. If you read the link I tried to provide (stupid rule) you'll see why it's required and why it's supposed to be done in residential homes also. Just do a GOOGLE search "Why is caulking a toilet required."
 
  #14  
Old 01-20-23, 11:36 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,398
Received 722 Upvotes on 633 Posts
Most of the new residential homes I painted, I was required to caulk the commode. Never known of a flooring guy to do it, that was part of my job.
 
  #15  
Old 01-20-23, 12:24 PM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,089
Received 29 Upvotes on 24 Posts
We had to stop pulling them several years ago. Violated plumbing code and insurance would not cover. There are senseless rules in all national codes. I never liked pulling them anyway.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: