Can of worms downstairs bathroom floor.


  #1  
Old 07-26-23, 03:28 PM
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Can of worms downstairs bathroom floor.

I was going to put peel and stick, TrafficMaster Carrara Marble 12-inch x 24-inch Peel and Stick Vinyl Tile (20 sq. ft. / case) Home Depot, over existing vinyl floor. When I removed the base cabinet for the sink I found how bad the floor really is. So I have ripped it up, well in the process of ripping it up, down to concrete.

Seems the first flooring level has a paper backing, what is the best way to remove all this. I have found by wetting it, the paper comes up easier, but still need to scrape a lot.

Should I after removing as much of the paper as I can by scraping use my angle grinder with wire wheel to make sure I get it all?

​Prior to laying the peel and stick what prep to the concrete should I do.

​Thanks.





 
  #2  
Old 07-26-23, 04:25 PM
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Just get it clean, especially no grease.
 
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Old 07-26-23, 05:56 PM
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I had one opinion on peel and stick on bare concrete that it would not stick very well.
Instead use a waterproof vinyl click and lock.
 
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Old 07-26-23, 06:12 PM
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Kind of looks like the backing off the vinyl flooring to me.

A waterproof laminate would be easiest. Floor just has to be flat.
 
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Old 07-26-23, 06:27 PM
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+1 on the waterproof vinyl. The peel and stick tiles will eventually telegraph any tiny imperfections in the concrete, so you have to grind down any bumps or humps, and fill and holes, dips or cracks. Usually it is easier to skim coat the floor to get it perfectly flat and even. Or you can put down plywood underlayment first.

To give you an idea of how flat and even the floor has to be: At a place I used to work, we put down glue down heavy vinyl tile over the concrete. We didn't remove some masking tape that the previous tenant put on the floor to divide the area. A few months later you could clearly see where the tape was under the tile; even something that thin telegraphed through the tile.

The click and lock is a lot more forgiving of the floor underneath, but even with that you have to make sure there are no big dips or humps. The manufacturer will specify how big a dip or hump is acceptable.
 
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Old 07-27-23, 10:57 AM
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I have to jump in and agree the waterproof vinyl click flooring is the way to go. It might cost a few $$ more, but for a small area, it's so incredibly worthwhile.

I don't install the peel and stick vinyl anywhere. It seems like no matter how clean the floor is, it still always has some areas that don't adhere well.
 
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Old 07-28-23, 06:50 PM
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this is what Im going with, person at store says that I don't need underlayment, is that correct?
TrafficMaster 4 mm Waterproof Wickford Oak 7-inch x 42-inch Rigid Core Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring (24.90 sq. ft. / case)


 
 

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