Cement Backerboard Installation

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  #1  
Old 01-18-03, 10:18 AM
Brick.b
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Cement Backerboard Installation

Iím currently installing ceramic tile on a kitchen floor. Following the removal of 50-year-old vinyl tile, Iím left with tarpaper & tarry residue on plywood subfloor; some of the tarpaper is well bonded to the subfloor. Backerboard installation instructions call for the ľĒ backerboard to be glued & screwed to the subfloor. Iím concerned that the tarry residue would be a poor bonding surface for the cement backer board.

1. Does anyone know of a product that would adhere the backerboard to the subfloor? Removal of all residues seems like impossibility and replacing the plywood subfloor seems like a smaller job.
2. The tarpaper apparently provided a moisture barrier, should I replace this barrier or will the backer board suffice? The kitchen floor is over a finished basement and not over earth.
3. Locally we have two types of backer board, one is made of a cement/cellulose mixture (Hardibacker) while the other is glass-reinforced cement (Wonderboard). Are there any large advantages of one over the other?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-18-03, 10:29 AM
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Brick,

The purpose for the use of thinset under the backerboard is routinely misunderstood.

The purpose is to give the backerboard a "bed" to lay in removing the chance of movement (up and down) that would occur when using just fasteners without the thinset. The thinset will in time debond from the structure and this is a good thing they say.

This would isolate the tile job from the structure allowing for some movement (expansion and contraction) that will occur over time and seasonal changes in weather. You should also install your backer board so that the fasteners used do not penetrate the structural members but instead remain in the subfloor covering only.

I know..."Clear as mud".

Anyway...if you remove as much of the "ichy stuff" as you can so there won't be any humps to deal with then you'll be in great shape to continue.

"Ichy Stuff" is a high tech term used by tile guys so be careful where you use it.

A moisture barrier isn't necessary and personally I prefer the Wonderboard over the Hardi. Hardi can be a pain in the dukas to work with in my opinion.
 
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Old 01-18-03, 10:36 AM
Brick.b
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Bud,
Thanks for the excellent explanation.
 
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Old 01-18-03, 10:45 AM
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The work has only just begun.
 
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Old 01-18-03, 04:24 PM
TileguyTodd
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I Must concur with my esteemed colleuge on the above.
And Bud and i actually have been agreeing on most things for a long time. Not bad for a guy from Nebraska!!
 
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Old 01-19-03, 10:21 AM
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Todd, pheasant season in Nebraska ends early this year you know? You been here yet?
 
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Old 01-20-03, 09:44 AM
TileguyTodd
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Bud, I didnt even get to go deer hunting this year. 4 county garages with 2000 s/f of metro 6x6 each.a couple hospital bathrooms.And a few misc jobs to boot and everything out in fugowie land.Cant wait for feb 8th Cabo san lucas here i come
 
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