Replace Drain Assembly in 1971 tiled Florida Bath


  #1  
Old 02-13-03, 03:32 PM
Rotonda Dave
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Question Replace Drain Assembly in 1971 tiled Florida Bath

No leaks! However, the old drain opening is corroded, ugly and needs to be replaced. Setting: 1971 Florida bungalow with sunken, tiled tub set about 6" below concrete slab with a 5 1/2" ridge set on slab grade upon which the sliding glass shower doors are mounted so as to provide a tiled tub abaout 12" deep should you fill it completly with water. The current drain has no hair strainer and is designed to be plugged with a chrome plated drain plug that is equally corroded.
#1 How do I remove the old drain
#2 Any tips to install a new one with strainer?
Right now, the drain is an open hole inviting any number of things to fall into it and plug it up.
I'll answer any questions to clear things up.
Thanks,
Dave
 
  #2  
Old 02-13-03, 06:01 PM
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Dave to see it would be a lot better but I can tell you that typically the tub drain/strainers are easily removed. They simply screw into place and screw out. What you will need is a funny looking little tool called a "P.O. Plug Wrench". You can find them at any Home Center or plumbing supply.

Insert the wrench into the drain and lock it into position then firmly turn the wrench counterclockwise. The drain cup should turn slowly at first then be easy to remove. If you can't budge that little puppy then you can add the assistance of an adjustable wrench fitted to the "cross" portion of the P.O. Wrench. The combination of the two wrenches used at the same time will surely remove the rascal.

The new drain is then installed in the opposite fashion (clockwise) using some teflon tape on the threads and some "Plumbers Putty" under the flange prior to assembly. The putty will oose as you tighten the drain. Once tight remove the access putty and your done.
 
  #3  
Old 02-14-03, 05:44 AM
Rotonda Dave
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New Info for Bud Cline on Tiled Florida Bath

Thanks Bud for your quick reply. I don't have a digital camera to put photos up for you but I can describe the drain itself better.
It is 2 3/4" in diameter with the drain i.d. being 1 5/8". The individual tile pieces are 1X2's and are grouted right up to the edge of the drain flange. The flange sticks up above the tiled surface about 1/8" to 1/4". The floor slopes nicely toward the drain but in immediate proximity to the drain flange, the tile pieces angle downward more, which explains why the flange is higher than the tiled surface.
Does this help? Or is your original advice the same?
Thanks in advance,

Dave
 

Last edited by Rotonda Dave; 02-15-03 at 01:39 PM.
  #4  
Old 02-16-03, 10:18 AM
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Dave,

There is no "typical" way to build a tile tub that I'm aware of. Generally those things are a design of their creator and therefore almost anything could be concocted that would get the job done.

In the case of the drain fitting, that would be one of the trickier things to do and I am assuming the drain assembly itself is something that was bought off-the-shelf and made to work, this is only guesswork on my part.

You should be able to look at the drain and compare it to what you see when you look at a standard bathtub drain. (Yeah I know...not much to see)

I'm sorry I don't have any more information for you beyond what I have already said. Try to determine if the fitting is a standard fitting. If so then what I said earlier should apply.
 
 

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