Ceramic tile on painted concrete


  #1  
Old 02-17-03, 11:04 AM
Kathy479
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Ceramic tile on painted concrete

I want to lay ceramic floor tile on a concrete floor. The floor has been painted twice in the past. Do I need to remove as much paint as I can from the floor first? The paint is not peeling and I know I could never get it all up. Also, I was advised to lay cheap linoleum tiles on the concrete first and then lay the ceramic tiles on top of them. Should I do that? Help.

Kathy
 
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Old 02-17-03, 12:59 PM
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Paint (on concrete) is a proven bond-breaker when it comes to ceramic tile jobs. It should all be removed by either sandblasting or shotblasting. Chemical removal could also cause tile problems if all the chemical residue is not removed also.

The linolem tile thing is non-sense. Giving whomever told you that the benefit of the doubt (and I do so begrudgingly) I'm sure they must have been thinking of using the linoleum to seperate the tile installation from the concrete if in the event there is problems with your concrete. This is being done I hear but not only is it NOT RECOMMENDED it is strenuously discouraged.

If there are cracking problems with your concrete there are plenty of "cleavage membranes" on the market intended for the purpose.
 
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Old 02-19-03, 12:31 PM
Kathy479
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Bud, Thank you very much. That is not the reply I wanted, but I think it is the correct one. I am afraid that sandblasting is not an option. Is there any other method I could use to take the old paint off?
 
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Old 02-19-03, 12:52 PM
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Kathy,

It's only fair to tell you that there exists some standards (basic minimums) in this business that come from several sources probably the most prominent being The Tile Council of America.

Unfortunately there are plenty of installers that don't and won't adhere to these practices that are designed by this industry and for the betterment of this industry and the success and longevity of any tile installation.

I can't in good conscience stray too far outside industry standards, I wouldn't want to be the reason your installation failed.

There are companies that you can hire to shotblast your floor and it really doesn't cost that much. You may want to look into this.

Having said all this there is one other method you may want to try on your own. You can rent a floor machine that uses abrasive pads/papers. These machines are similar to what you see being used to buff floors in grocery stores. The difference is the attachment that holds the sandpaper. Sandpaper for these machines is available in about a twenty-four grit which is very aggressive. Try that. I would stick my neck out and say that if you were to be able to remove a minimum of 80% of the paint and you were to use a quality modified thinset to install your tile, you would be safe. Be sure to use proper safety equipment in the process.
 
 

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