help with a partially unbonded tile


  #1  
Old 07-23-03, 06:53 AM
rdmpe
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Question help with a partially unbonded tile

help with a partially unbonded tile...

Hi,
I removed tile from a terazzo floor and am putting new tile down. I bought the thinset with latex additive in the powder and have been mixing it with water. There were two versions of plymer modified thinset to choose from and I bought the best one they offered. I can post the brand and type once I get home tonight. But it's too late to change now. I have about half of the uncut tiles in now. We have been walking on the tiles after 24 hours since we need access to the kitchen, etc. No grout is in yet.

************** NEED ADVICE HERE **********************
The only real problem I have so far is one batch of thinset was probably mixed too dry, and I have two tiles in that area which have an unbonded corner. I have to decide whether to try to fix it in place by working thinset under the tile around the edges, or break and remove the tile, scrape the thinset and replace with a new tile. I would rather not remove the tile if there is a decent chance of getting it set good enough. The hollow sound is limited to one corner, and the tiles don't pull up by hand.
 
  #2  
Old 07-23-03, 04:01 PM
D
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For what it's worth I'd change the one or two tile that sound hallow, it will be easier than to try to squeeze thinset between them and the terrazzo. Unless the tile with the bonding issue has elabotate cuts to go around stuff and you will need to rent the tools again to cut the tile
 
  #3  
Old 07-23-03, 06:20 PM
rdmpe
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Well, I've gone over the whole area that I put tile down, and I've found several more. There are probably 8 to 10 tiles that have at least some hollow sounding area. The tiles are about 16" square. I still haven't decided what to do about them, I'm not sure how common this is. Would you still recommend popping the tiles out and resetting them?

Now I want to know what I'm doing wrong. The tiles are powdery on the bottom, and it seems to me that they would bond better if I wiped them off with a damp cloth before putting them down, in order to take off some of the powder. Nobody ever mentioned it to me before though, so I thought it would be OK without wiping them off. Any other suggestions for avoiding this problem with the remaining tiles?
 
  #4  
Old 07-23-03, 06:32 PM
floorman
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need to know the type of tile we are talking about ceramic,porcelain,limestone?and also the size of the notch in the trowel,also the the name of the thin set and how you are going about mixing it
 
  #5  
Old 07-23-03, 08:05 PM
rdmpe
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OK, Here is the info...

- Ceramic tile (not porcelain), 16.25" square

- Trowel notches are 1/2" square, 1/2" spacing

- Thinset is "Jamo" brand "Multipurpose Flex" Here's the specs:
http://www.jamoinc.com/pdf/Datasheet...eflex_E_ds.htm

- I mix about 1/3 of a bag in a 5 gallon bucket, using a mixing rod on a drill and also mixing by hand. I'm probably getting air mixed in there with it due to the drill.

I decided to try a repair by using a disposable cake frosting bag and squeezing more thinset down under the problem tiles as much as possible all along them. I figured if it doesn't work I'm not really out anything but a half hour of time... We'll see how it works.
 
  #6  
Old 07-24-03, 04:10 AM
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Hollow tiles can be attributed to an unlevel subfloor, or combing the mortar in a swirling pattern, or your gently placing tiles.

Comb your thinset in straight lines. Then when setting tiles, hold them at a 30 to 45 angle, with your comb lines. Then let go of the tile. It should "pop" with a distinct sound. Pushing all the air out of the combed thinset lines.
 
  #7  
Old 07-24-03, 08:11 AM
hawg
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unless those tiles are on the outer edge, getting thinset back under them will be difficult, regardless of what you use (i'd try with real thin thin-set with your cake set going real slow injection rate)....but, i would walk on them some....if they don't break now, i doubt they will when they are secured on the perimeter with grout.....


definately need to wipe dusty tiles off as well as take off any stickers or tags off the back of them....both hamper adhesion...

and when laying tiles, make sure to drag your mud line OUTSIDE the perimeter of the tile....that where most of the low spots seem to occur.....


hawg
 
  #8  
Old 07-24-03, 04:37 PM
rdmpe
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Thanks for the tips - I'll be laying some more tiles tonight, hopefully I won't have any more problems.
 
  #9  
Old 07-24-03, 07:37 PM
ee3
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comb thin set in straight lines

are you a member of the NTCA? Doing this works so much better then the way most were taught or beating the glaze off it tring to set it!! Here's to you!!!!Good advice to all!!
 
  #10  
Old 07-26-03, 08:50 PM
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Re: comb thin set in straight lines

Originally posted by ee3
are you a member of the NTCA?

No
I just play one on TV.
 
 

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