Hardiboard


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Old 11-11-03, 10:54 AM
ricciuto
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Hardiboard

I think this is the name of a backerboard sold at Home Depot. I would like to know if anyone has any experience with this brand for a backer board with ceramic floor tile? Do the seams need to be covered with a seam tape with thinset?
 
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Old 11-11-03, 01:23 PM
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Hardibacker or Denshield don't get many rave reviews in the industry.

There are far better products that can be used and that are easier to install.

Yes, Hardibacker should be taped along the joint with mesh tape.
 
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Old 11-11-03, 04:38 PM
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The Home Depot near me sells all of the big three: DUROCK, Wonderboard, and Hardibacker. I've used them all and have no particular preference. The installation process is nearly identical for all of them, and they all cost about the same. Hardibacker emits less dust when you handle it and cut it, but people often complain of having trouble driving the screws far enough to get the heads flush (a problem I have too, even when using Hardibacker screws).
 
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Old 11-12-03, 04:51 PM
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Good point, John.

You've just illustrated two of the reasons why there are better products to use as an underlayment.

Making dust and trying to get screws flush.

DITRA requires no screws and doesn't make any dust. It's also much lighter, too. You can cut it with a box cutter knife and there's virtually no wastage. DITRA won't damage your walls if it hits them and you can carry the equivalent of more than 21 sheets of CBU under one arm. You'd need a pickup truck to carry that footage of CBU or Hardibacker around.

Sure, I sell it -- and promote it. I wouldn't sell it if it wasn't the best product out there. Eventually, people are going to see that using CBU or these composite boards is passé.
 
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Old 11-13-03, 04:16 AM
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Thanks for the responses. I hear DITRA mentioned often. What kind of product is it? How is it put down over existing flooring? Can it be nailed or screwed? Can it be purchased at Home Deptot's or Lowes? How large are the sheets?
 
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Old 11-13-03, 04:56 AM
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The DITRA doesn't have to be nailed or screwed. It's a membrane with a fleece side that anchors it to the subfloor using thinset.

You use the appropriate thinset (dry-set or modified) to attach it to the subfloor. If you are going on top of plywood or OSB, you'd apply it with a modified thinset. If you are going over top of a concrete slab or CBU, then you'd use dry-set mortar.

Note: This is the only method of using mortar over OSB. Never tile directly over OSB.

HD does sell it, Lowe's doesn't. They can be pricey and you might have to twist their arm to make them believe they actually do sell it. They can sell it by the 323 or 54 square foot roll.

We can cut it to your size. Just follow the link at the bottom of this post.

David
 
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Old 11-13-03, 08:29 AM
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"'THE ONLY" ???
 
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Old 11-13-03, 08:37 AM
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Yes, the only.

The only time you can install mortar directly over OSB is when you have a product which reduces the bonding requirement for such.

I did not say that it was the only product, just the only method. You do not tile directly over OSB with mortar.
 
 

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