Tips for cutting corners off large tiles?

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  #1  
Old 02-05-04, 08:22 AM
Bea Tyler
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Question Tips for cutting corners off large tiles?

Hi, I've done some small tile jobs before and am ready to tackle a 300 square foot room with 18" X 18" ceramic tiles. I want to put 3" X 3" keys every other joint, which means every large tile will need at least one corner cut off. I have a small wet saw, but since I can't use the fence, what's a good way to get straight clean corner cuts with such a large tile?

Also, the room has baseboards that I would rather not remove. Should I grout the outer edges of the tiles (next to the baseboards), before installing my new 1/4" round?

The room adjoins a hallway with a hardwood floor that will be about 1/4" lower in height. No bullnose is available for my tile choice. Should I use a Schluter strip, then cover the joint with a sloped wood threshhold strip?

Thank you for your help!
B.T.
 
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Old 02-05-04, 03:49 PM
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You can make a jig to hold the tile at the desired angle to the fence of your wet saw to have uniform cuts.

Leave a 1/4" around the perimeter with no grout. If needed you can use a color matched sanded caulk. then your quarter round.

There are wooden threshhold strips with a rabbit cut in the back of one side to cover the edge of the tile. Check with your tile dealer, they can get you hooked up.
 
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Old 02-05-04, 05:10 PM
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You might want to rent a larger tile saw to cut the big tiles. Having a larger surface will make handing those big tiles easier.
 
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Old 02-05-04, 09:18 PM
Bea Tyler
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Thank you for the replies. I have not ever made a jig - I imagine it to be a piece of, say 3/8" plywood about 2/3 the width of a tile turned diagonally with a cutout that will hold the tiles correctly while providing a straight edge to slide along the fence?

Also, I see there are a lot of different sizes, types, and methods used with backer boards. Is there any rule of thumb for use with a 3/8" tile? They're going in immediately next to another tile floor, so I might have to go with only a 1/4" backer board to keep adjacent floors even. Is this OK? I was planning on using thinset under the backer board, screwing it down, taping the joints, and putting thinset over the tape joints. All this sound good?

Is is OK to use premixed thinset or is that a less desireable product (as I have read in other posts here and elsewhere)?

Appreciate the interest!
B.T.
 
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Old 02-06-04, 12:04 PM
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You're on the right track Bea, take good measurements, & double check your math to ensure you come out with a good flat floor. The 1/4" cbu should be fine, there are other alternitives, like Ditra to solve height issues also. Use mesh tape on the joints. Stay in this same thread & post back if you've still got questions. Happy tiling!
 
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Old 02-06-04, 06:17 PM
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Premix thinset is another word for JUNK.
 
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Old 02-07-04, 06:34 PM
floorman
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there are subfloor requirements that need to be met as well did you do all the homework on the subfloor?You need a min. of 1 1/8 of subfloor to support the tile job,also this is assuming that you have the proper joists and size of joists and span of the beams and also the proper ply wood for the subfloor as well.Just trying to play the devils advocate here and make sure this is addressed before tiling is all
 
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Old 02-10-04, 07:06 AM
Bea Tyler
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Hmm, thanks for that additional info floorman. I'm not worried about the joists, as they are 2" X 8" X 15' spaced 16" apart. And I'm not worried about the existing subfloor - it's 3/4" real plywood. But you're saying that I need 3/8" MORE subfloor in the form of backerboard, i.e. the thickness of two layers of thinset don't count?

If using 3/8" backerboard (if it's even available in that thickness) would mean my new tile floor sits 1/8" ABOVE the adjoining tile floor, how risky would it be to use 1/4" backerboard and have a uniform height between rooms?

Also, I'm putting in a natural stone border between the rooms and was told that I need to seal the natural stones with "miracle" before grouting them. Can anyone comment on this requirement (it was printed on my tile receipt). Do I brush seal the whole tile, just the edges, one coat, what else?

Thanks for the replies!
Bea
 
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Old 02-10-04, 03:07 PM
floorman
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you may be pushing it a bit far with the subfloor 2x8's are kinda flimsy may be too much deflection and cause problems.

The stone does need to be sealed everywhere but the bottom of it so it will stick to the thinset and be stable
 
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Old 02-11-04, 09:34 AM
Bea Tyler
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Floorman, your comment about flimsy made me go recheck the joist measurements because the floor is not flimsy. The joists are in fact 2" X 10" X 15', and they each have a criss-cross 1" X 4" support bridge halfway down the length.

Given this new information, do you think a subfloor of 3/4" real plywood and a 1/4" backerboard would be sufficient for 3/8" tiles (narrow stone border, main area ceramic)?

Also is it better to seal the natural stone tiles before or after setting them, and is one coat enough?

Thank you,
Bea
 
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Old 02-15-04, 07:48 AM
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The joists are in fact 2" X 10" X 15', and they each have a criss-cross 1" X 4" support bridge halfway down the length.

Others may disagree, but according to the trusty deflect-ometer, your floor isn't rated for either tile or stone. Sorry to rain on your parade.
 
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Old 02-15-04, 11:16 AM
floorman
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the bracing certainly helps,it's the span that is killin this project though.

I know you want this floor to match the other but in doing so you will compromise the new one.Go with the 1/2 durock glued and screwed and then deal with the transition later anything less and i think you will be headed for trouble,were kinda pushing things the way we are now.

Seal the stone after setting and before grouting
 
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Old 02-15-04, 06:04 PM
Bea Tyler
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Hmm, my special order tiles just came in =O

Where can I get more information on floor ratings? What's a deflectometer?

If the bridging is a help, would it be enough of a benefit to justify the time and expense of adding two more bridges per span, so there would be bridging support at 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 of the way along each span?

Or should I investigate another means of support entirely? There is adequate clear space underneath the floor to insert additional support in the crawl space (4' height). What's the easiest cheapest WORTHWHILE method of gaining sufficient support?

Thank you, Bea
 
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Old 02-15-04, 09:26 PM
Bea Tyler
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Here's a thought - what about using solid blocking, say 4 or 5 pieces along each span (perpendicular to the joists)? Or for that matter I could even put in ANOTHER 2' X10" joist between each existing joist and make them 8" on center. I don't really want to do that of course, but I think it's simpler than block columns or jackscrews. Any thoughts on a good approach to take?

http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/f...st1/sister.htm

Thanks, Bea
 
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