Cement board or DensShield?

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-26-04, 09:21 PM
u2slow
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cement board or DensShield?

I have 3/4" plasterboard/plaster throughout my home. The tub enclosure only has bullnose tile for the lower 16". I'll be tearing out the existing tile, and moving the faucet & showerhead. The plaster is good above the 2' mark, so I don't want to tear it all out. At Home Depot they carry Durock (cement board) and a tile backer board called DensShield. Both are only 1/2" thick I believe.

Which would be best to use to patch up my wall with the existing plaster?
What 1/4" material is best to use behind it to match my 3/4" thickness?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-27-04, 05:58 PM
A
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: canada
Posts: 673
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm not a big fan of Denshield, but it's a lot easier to handle and cut than cement board. What you could do, is buy some 1/2 green board drywall and attach it to the studs. Then put up some plastic to protect it from moisture...then over that, use 1/4" Rhino board that HD sells. This will give you the 3/4" you need, and it's also a good backing for new ceramic tile.
 
  #3  
Old 08-28-04, 05:58 AM
TileguyTodd
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I'm sorry, i will have to disagree with the above.further information would be needed to determine if this would be an acceptable method and i dont like the idea of mudding heavily to denshield which may become necessary with meeting plaster.
Typically plaster has a vapor barrier installed behind it(15# felt) and sandwiching 2 moisture barriers is not a good idea.
The cement board shimmed out the 1/4" will come close to matching up but plaster walls have a tendancy to not be perfect so mudding will become necessary. tape the seam with durock tape and use thinset to mud the seam area as you would a sheetrock joint.Keep in mind thinset does not sand like sheetrock mud so kep things smooth.
Good Luck!!
 
  #4  
Old 08-29-04, 06:48 AM
floorman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
All of this is contingent of course,on you being able to get the plaster out without loosening up the remaining plaster.You may be better off just tearing out that whole wall and replacing it,versus taking the chance that you will loosen the remaing plaster and have future problems with that too
 
  #5  
Old 09-03-04, 12:21 AM
u2slow
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I've begun now... once I tore into it, it became quite obvious all the plaster would be coming off. The walls are bare studs now, and I've picked up cement board.

I'm reading the instructions on the cement board, and there's no reference to any vapour barrier - just screw the board right onto the studs. Is that right? Or should I put up a layer of tar-paper just to be safe?
 
  #6  
Old 09-03-04, 03:49 AM
A
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: canada
Posts: 673
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, put the vapour barrier.
 
  #7  
Old 09-03-04, 05:53 PM
Abyss
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Talking

Originally Posted by u2slow
I've begun now... once I tore into it, it became quite obvious all the plaster would be coming off. The walls are bare studs now, and I've picked up cement board.

I'm reading the instructions on the cement board, and there's no reference to any vapour barrier - just screw the board right onto the studs. Is that right? Or should I put up a layer of tar-paper just to be safe?
Go to this link and click on "application". http://www.usg.com/Product_Index/_pr...oducts&sp=true

Itís the official USG Durock site...
You can buy a Durock kit at builder stores that comes with Durock tape and special Durock screws. If you can't find the kit buy ROCK ON screws. I just applied this product myself. As said above...keep a 1/8 gap between joints and make sure you use thin set tile adhesive to mud your joints. I'm good with a circular saw so thatís what I used to make my cuts perfect. Make sure what ever you use to cut the Durock that it has Carbide cutting tips.
 
  #8  
Old 09-04-04, 10:31 AM
floorman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The thing about putting a vapor barrier under the cement board is once you nail or screw into that you putting a bunch of holes in something that is intended to keep th moisture out so it's kind like [email protected]@ing in the wind,you're gonna get wet.The only time that i am aware of showers calling for a vapor barrier is in steam showers and that barrier goes on top the durock not under it.

Use the rock and make sure you tape the joints and caulk the corners with silicone and take a finger and smooth it into the corner and let dry, you are ready to go
 
  #9  
Old 09-15-04, 11:23 AM
u2slow
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Weird... I checked in here just a couple days ago and there were no replies... maybe I was looking at a cached page

I picked up the Durock screw/tape kit. Then installed the Durock following the instructions and taped/mudded all the seams with thinset. Came out nice! Now I just to put up the shower doors and tile

Thanks for the advice guys!

Now the floor is another story

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=180831
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: