Tile grout question?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-20-04, 07:21 AM
irv63
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Tile grout question?

I am having my bathroom redone and we are using ceramic tile that has wavy ~ edges. My installer wasnt familiar with them and ended up not leaving enough space for grout on some of the tile pieces due to the wavy pattern.
Is this a problem?
Once he is done grouting, will it leave breaks in the grout lines when it gets to the spot where the tiles actually touch?
SHould I have him redo whole wall or will it be fine?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-20-04, 08:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
sound to me like some of the tiles aren't on straight.Although they may be wavy they are all wavy in the same way especially at the corners where spacers should have been used in conjunction with layout lines. The problem you discribe could not happen if spacers and lines were used[unless tiles are defective in which case they should not have been used]. It would be very unusual to find a tile[that wasn't handmade] that is so randomly wavy that it could cause this to happen.There needs to be the same grout width or it will look bad. Certainly NO grout joint is unacceptable and should be fixed. The tiles could also have moved if the weren't supported when they should have been. Make sure the installer doesn't say that you touched them,and moved them, when you didn't. Maybe the tiles had to be installed with mating edges next to each other,who knows but no grout joint in no good any way it happened. Moisture will definitely get in if it is in the shower or bath area and if it is on walls out side the wet area moisture is still an issue aside from the issue that the tiles should not be touching. Use a straight edge to see if they are straight.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-04, 09:02 AM
irv63
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks joneq for your reply

It is interesting......although the tiles we chose are very wavy (and not in a consistant way), I think that is how the tiles are supposed to be. I just think that the installer thought that the wider parts of the grout lines would be too big if he spaced them the way they were intended to be. I told him that we require a minimum of 1/8 inch grout line at the closest point and if the corners are a 1/2 as a result, then so be it. I definitely thought it was a problem not having some of the tiles without enough space for grout.
Thanks and I agree with you.

p.s. not a tile question but maybe you can answer:
We added a soffit above the shower and since we were adding canned lighting , we needed to make sure there was no insulation near the light and therefore removed all the insulation above the 1st floor shower and the 2nd floor shower. Will this be a problem with cold/heat and noise? We did ask that the contractor staple a row of insulation to the under flooring of the above floor, but he forgot,,,,,and rather than have him remove the drywall and cement board in order to put 1 layer of insulation, we thought we would just forget it. SHould there be insulation between the floors or is it no big deal?
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-04, 09:30 AM
irv63
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
minimum spacing for grout?

is there a rule for a minimum space for grout?

Or as long as the tiles are not touching and some grout can get in there its ok?

I guess my case sucks because we needed to use sanded grout due to some spaces being over 1/8 inch, so when the spaces are 1/16 or less - its harder for the grout to get in htere.
Any comments?
 
  #5  
Old 10-20-04, 09:49 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
insulation goes on exterior walls or in the attic. I don't have any in my soffit area and I have no problems. You need to have some grout in there. If you told the guy you were using sanded grout it was his job to leave at least 1/8". If the tiles are randomly wavy he should have picked another tile. If you want to you could let the guy use a dremel tool to widen the joints where necessary. Or if there is some space use unsanded grout in the small joints first and then use sanded grout after it and pray that it is the same color. Probably won't notice too much, but you do need to get something in there.


I wouldn't go less than 1/16" for non sanded grout in your case. I mean how much less can you go????
 

Last edited by joneq; 10-20-04 at 09:52 AM. Reason: add
  #6  
Old 10-20-04, 10:16 AM
irv63
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks again

I had the installer remove tiles and redo in order to have at least 1/16 - 1/8 space at the closest points.
We actually picked this tile (which we love), but its just so wavy that it makes it hard to line up and use spacers consistantly. We just have to be prepared to have a variety of spacing between the tiles (which gives it a cool look), some places are 1/2 inch and some are 1/16 .

I wish I could attach a photo , but dont know how.


anyway - i made him redo.......hopefully it doesnt screw things up by removing and reattaching.
He put them up yesterday, so hopefully 1 day isnt a big deal in regard to curing.
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-04, 10:22 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,615
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That was the best thing to do.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: