Tub grouting,caulking


  #1  
Old 01-12-05, 05:24 AM
mountainmama
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Tub grouting,caulking

Help! Projects always turn out to be way more involved ... The lowest level of tiles between the wall and the bathtub on the tub's long side have lost some of their grouting. I bought some "ceramic tile adhesive and caulk" from Home Depot that claims you can use it restore cracked or worn grout lines. The tub also needs to be recaulked where the tub and tile meet. I started cleaning around the tiles to make sure the surface was "free of all contamination" when the tiles easily came off the sub-surface and revealed an ugly mess. Looks like the grout had been gone for a long time (we just moved in to the house) because much of the sub-surface was wet and some parts of it crumble right off. I can tell there is another surface behind that (drywall??) and can feel cold air leaking in.

Can I just clean the subsurface and re-apply the tiles with adhesive and then recaulk along the bottom of the tiles where they meet the tub? Do I need to patch the subsurface first? If so how? And what do I use to clean the subsurface? (So far I've used mildew remover and then some bleach in the area)

Your speedy help is much appreciated! I'm stuck and I need to fix it fast!!
 
  #2  
Old 01-12-05, 12:03 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,131
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Sounds like you have a failing green board shower. The length of time you get out of any attemp to repair will be minimal at best. Once the gypsum core is penatrated and starts to fall apart, it's time to bite the bullet and redo the shower enclosure. It really is not much more than a 3 day project, you can get the old walls down in just a couple of hours and new moisture barrier and cement board installed and the joints thinsetted all in one day. If you hang some poly from the top of the enclosure, you can even use the shower while in progress if you only have one in your house. Set the tile on the second day, grout and caulk the next, and just leave the poly up on the walls for a couple days while you give the grout time to cure. The other option would be to remove the walls, replace the sheet rock and install an acrylic or fiberglass surround. While I'm not a fan of those, in a pinch, it is a one day project. Let us know what you want to do and if it can be out of commision for a few days and we'll walk you through each step.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-05, 04:37 AM
mountainmama
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Redo the whole thing??

That's bad news! I've taken off quite a bit of tile now and the rot does stop, I don't believe it goes all the way to the top of the tiled wall. Do you still think the whole enclosure should be redone?

If so, I think I'd lean towards the acrylic or fiberglass surround. I have 2 small kids and though my husband and I can work on it at night, progress would be slow. Why are you not a fan of these?
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-05, 07:30 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,131
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Why am I not a fan? For the same reason a hardwood installer does not like tile floors. THey are certainly easier to install and require less maintenace than a tiled shower, and can be completed in a few hours rather than a couple of days. I would install new sheetrock in the surround, green board would be fine behind an acrylic surround, just make sure to leave it 1/4" off the base of the tub deck. If you choose to retile, then go with backer board. An acrylic or fiberglass surround is a few hour project on the week end. I have one bath and remodeled ours, all new fixtures and tile, 4 kids and one frustrated wife during the whole process, but it can be done. Of course, with my experience, I was able to use fast setting mortars and it was done quicker than most people would have been able to do it.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: