attaching to granite countertop?


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Old 02-12-05, 05:47 PM
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Converted portable DW - attaching to granite countertop?

Another freakin' fantabulous job by my contractor... had a Kenmore portable DW converted to under-counter, but the contractor never attached the machine to the underside of the countertop. Hence everytime you open it, you need to brace it so it doesn't tip forward/out. I see the tabs on the DW where it should be screwed to the underside of the countertop, but the counters are granite and I'm VERY concerned about making a fatal error here.

Help?!?

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-12-05, 08:56 PM
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Best bet would be to call the fabrication shop that made the countertop and ask them what to do. I'm sure the stone can be drilled but let them do it or tell you how
 
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Old 02-13-05, 06:45 AM
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Thanks, Tileguybob... That was my thought, too, but they're super-busy (took 6 months for them to install a small section that was an after-thought), so may be years before they'd come out again. But probably my safest. smartest bet.
 
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Old 02-13-05, 11:05 AM
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As a temporay solution could you wedge some wood shims or blocks up there to keep the DW from tipping forward. Maybe epoxy glue the block in place on the underside of the granite and after it dries screw the DW into the block.
 
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Old 02-13-05, 12:55 PM
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TileBob,

Great minds think alike I had done just that with liquid nails and 1/2" screws into a piece of pressboard, but the pressure of the machine trying to tip snapped the "wood", which then fell out. It did last about 4 months, though. I will see if I have any more substantial wood around here (that one was a scrap from something-or-the-other, and really too soft) and try the cheat again. Can't use longer than 1/2" screws for fear of fracturing the granite, but know 1/2" isn't much.

Off to look in the cellar for wood... and locate the damn serial # off my dispos-all!

Thanks
 
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Old 02-13-05, 07:55 PM
lockpicker
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instead of wood could you ues a

Rubber or plastic door stop!!!
 
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Old 03-27-05, 07:56 PM
wizisthebomb
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instead of liquid nails, try a two-part epoxy. I would recommend getting a two-part epoxy intended for use on granite. you can find it online, or possibly somewhere in your locality. online, try National Abrasives, or google search for granite+epoxy (or something along those lines). locally look for companies with "abrasives" in their name, I have found that to be the secret term for finding granite-related product distributors. once you have the epoxy, you could try using it to glue a nut to the granite, then you could use a bolt to thread through the d/w bracket into the nut. this of course, would likely be a temporary solution at best.

you can, depending on the thickness of the granite, also use a masonry drill bit to drill holes in the granite - on a 3/4-inch thick slab you can use a 3/8-inch bit and drill to no more than 5/8-inch deep. I have personally done this, though the slab I drilled was not installed, so I was drilling down into the slab, whereas you would be drilling upwards. shouldn't be a problem though, just use a variable-speed drill with a carbide-tipped masonry bit at semi-low (1000 or less) rpms, and stop when the bit starts heating up, allowing it to cool before restarting. two holes would probably suffice, into which you could epoxy threaded studs, then use a nut to secure the d/w bracket. ALWAYS WEAR EYE PROTECTION AND A RATED PARTICULATE-FILTER MASK WHEN DRY-CUTTING, DRILLING, ETC. INTO GRANITE, MARBLE OR OTHER STONE SUBSTANCES.

I am actually quite surprised that there is not plywood under the granite. this seems to be standard practice in my neck-o-the-woods.
 
 

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