Shower Stall Floor Tile Help


  #1  
Old 03-25-05, 11:07 AM
mike_s
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Shower Stall Floor Tile Help

I am finishing off a shower stall with a cement base. I have just finished the wall tile and need some advice before I start the floor tile.

There is approx. a 1/16" gap between the base and the bottom of the wall tile. Should this space be caulked before I install the floor tile or not?
 

Last edited by mike_s; 03-25-05 at 11:37 AM.
  #2  
Old 03-26-05, 07:00 AM
T
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Tipicaly, the wall tile is brought down to the floor, cut to the floor, the last tile installed is the bottom row of the wall. The intersection between the wall and the floor is caulked since grout will just crack out. I don't want to open a can of worms here, but could you explain how the pan was constructed? Even if it was inspected and passed, doesn't mean it was constructed right, only that it held water and if it holds water without draining it all out of the seting bed, you will be in for problems. The caulk won't last at all if the pan was constructed wrong, and you did use cement board with a moisture retarder between the studs and the backer, right?
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-05, 11:24 AM
mike_s
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Thanks for the reply. Maybe I should have explained myself better. Keep in mind that this is my first tiling job.

The shower stall was roughed in and the concrete pan was poured when I bought the house a few years ago. The base has the membrane which extends up approx. 3 inches above the edge of the base. Prior to the "blueboard" being put up, I installed a moisture barrier.

When I did the tiling on the walls I left the bottom row for last and just finished this the other day.

When I said I had a 1/16" space between the wall tile and the edge of the pan. The space is between the top edge of the pan and the bottom edge of the wall tile. I know that once I get the pan tiled and grouted, that the edges are siliconed but should I silicone that space between the pan and the bottom of the wall tile.
 
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Old 03-28-05, 05:55 AM
T
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I hate giving bad news on Mondays. If the liner was installed flat onto the sbstare and then a setting bed was installed over top, then the pan will hold water in the setting bed which will likely leach up into the walls causing deterioration. This is above and beyond the fact that an unpiched liner will allow mildew growth causing a locker room smelling shower pan. Blue board/green board are not acceptable substrates for shower walls. Some municipalities still allow it, some don't, but it is not approved by any thinset manufacturer or trade organization as a wet area substrate and will not be allowed anywhere in the US by code starting in 9 months. Your liner should have extended up the walls at least 3" above the finished curb height and if there are any wall fastener peenetrations through the liner or any penetrations through the liner as it goes over the curb with the exception of being tacked to the outside of the curb only, water will rot your curb and framing. Moisture retarders should not be used behind greenboard. The facing ov greenboard serves as the vapor barrier. This applies to all areas, even in dry areas on exterior walls where unfaced insulation would need to be used. Using a vapor barrier behind it causes the gypsum to be sandwiched between to impervious layers and any moisture that gets into it will have nowehere to get out. MR boards are vapor emmisive through the back facing of the board and need it free of barriers. You may get some time out of the shower or you may wnat to cut your losses now and redo it correctly as waiting for issues to visibly arise could be allowing lots of water and mold damage to occur unseen for quite a while. If you used mastic to set your tile and not thinset, these problems will become visible much quicker. Mastic should not be used in wet areas. If you did use mastic and you have not yet grouted, you should be able to salvage most if not all of the tile on the walls. Clean up old dried mastic by soaking the tile in a bucket of hot water and it should all come off easily as mastic will reemulsify in hot water, and does not return to its dry state.
 
 

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