Old vinyl tile squares and adhesive removal


  #1  
Old 05-09-05, 08:47 PM
oakview
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Old vinyl tile squares and adhesive removal

Posting for the first time:
I've removed about 150 sq. ft. of 30 year vinyl (or linoleum) tile, on concrete that's in good shape and level, in the kitchen/dining area where I plan to lay ceramic tile. The vinyl squares were laid with some sort of adhesive that was spread (you can still see the comb marks) and is a deep yellow in color, hardened, and is very difficult to remove. I've scraped both dry and with hot water in an effort to remove all of the old adhesive, and am finding it all but impossible to get the darn stuff off the floor. My sleeves are rolled clear up to my neck!

I've read many posts about this sort of question, but am a bit confused about how much of this stuff I need to remove, and still get the ceramic tiling done so it'll last. One post I read mentioned a special thinset that can be used over "cutback" on concrete. What's cutback? and do I need to remove all of this old adhesive? If so, what's the best way? Can I do a lasting tile job with a certain kind of thinset over this stuff if not completely removed?

Appreciate any professional advice I can get. Thanks in advance...
 
  #2  
Old 05-09-05, 09:05 PM
T
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You will need to install 1/2" concrete underlayment board (CUB) over plywood before installing ceramic tile. Make sure all loose adhesive is removed from the surface and verify that a good bond to the substrate can be achieved. For cut-back adhesive residue, verify that the thin-set manufacturer's mortar is compatible.

Cutback adhesive is a solvent based asphalt insulation adhesive of trowel consistency. Why cutback? The only thing I can think of is that it can be spread to 'cutback' or reduce the thickness of the application.
 
  #3  
Old 05-09-05, 09:29 PM
oakview
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Oops! Wasn't very clear I guess...

Thanks Twelvepole, but I didn't do a very good job of explaining my situation.

I intend to lay new creamic tile over an existing concrete slab that I removed the linoleum tile from. My question was regarding the old adhesive removal - the stuff is a barf yellow color, and is extremely tenacious. I've been scraping for days in an effort to get it all up, and still have a lot of area to do. There has got to be a better way??!

So, I was wondering how much, if any, of the old adhesive I can leave on the floor and still get a good, lasting bond between the thinset and concrete.

I was merely wondering what "cutback" is, I don't intend to use any of the stuff, whatever it is...
 
  #4  
Old 05-10-05, 02:54 AM
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Cutback adhesive is a black glue used to set 9" square asbestos tile, and shouldn't be sanded due to the fact that it contains asbestos as well.

As for what you have, if installed after 1980, probably safe to grind up, they rent machines that will remove it, but if hot water won't soften it up enough to scrape it and there's enough concrete showing that will absorb water, you can go over the residue with a good modified thinset, get any thick spots up though.

Flexbond from HD works fine or any top of the line modified.
kerabond/Keralastic is the best.
 
  #5  
Old 05-10-05, 08:17 AM
oakview
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Thank you...

Thanks R&D! The grinding method is probably the way I'll go - the linoleum tiles were laid in 1973 and have already been removed, leaving a substantial amount of the barf yellow mastic. Most of the area is pretty well covered with the stuff, plus it's shiny and will not allow water to pass through to the concrete when I do a water soak test.

One more question - can I grind the stuff after wetting the surface to try and lessen the dust? I tried a small area and created a pretty good dust cloud which we would rather avoid as we're living in the house while renovating the floor
 
  #6  
Old 05-10-05, 02:34 PM
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Yes, keep it wet, I would find out if it contains asbestos, cutback won't let water through either and it can be tiled over, hard to judge from here,
 
  #7  
Old 05-10-05, 03:48 PM
oakview
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Appreciate the advice...

Thank you very much R&D and Twelvepole... you've made it so I can get on with the task with some confidence.

Knowing that you all invest a good deal of your time to assist folks like me, just know that you're appreciated and valued for the sound advice that do-it-yourselfers can count on. I run a couple of web sites and can attest first-hand to the amount of time and energy you must spend around this forum.

Kudos!!
 
 

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