New construction tile questions.


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Old 05-28-05, 08:05 PM
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New construction tile questions.

My home is being built now. Just framing, no drywall. I ordered vinyl in all bathrooms. I thought their tile price was high. $1000 for a small bathroom, cheap tile!

I plan on installing tile in all bathrooms. Local tile store has great tile and patterns. Also have Ditra.
Right now the floor is 3/4" plywood. Floor joists are around 20" apart. Builder will glue vinyl directly to plywood.

Any suggestions on what I can do now?

I'm in Atlanta, GA
 
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Old 05-29-05, 03:59 AM
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STOP!, if you plan on tiling these floors, DON'T put any vinyl over them now, also, 3/4" plywood not enough subfloor for 20" spacing, you'll need another 1/2" ext grade AC or BC grade plywood, then 1/4" CBU or a membrane.

What size are the joists and the length of them unsupported?
 
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Old 06-06-05, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by R&D Tile
STOP!, if you plan on tiling these floors, DON'T put any vinyl over them now, also, 3/4" plywood not enough subfloor for 20" spacing, you'll need another 1/2" ext grade AC or BC grade plywood, then 1/4" CBU or a membrane.

What size are the joists and the length of them unsupported?
I wouldn't worry about the 20" for a washroom.....a kitchen span yes but not a small washroom.....I would however put wire lathe and a coat of thin set mortar to give the floor extra support.....the next day you'll have a concrete floor and it'll be ready for tiles.
 
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Old 06-06-05, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by future
I wouldn't worry about the 20" for a washroom.....a kitchen span yes but not a small washroom.....I would however put wire lathe and a coat of thin set mortar to give the floor extra support.....the next day you'll have a concrete floor and it'll be ready for tiles.
Michael, the method described above by Future for your tile will mean no future. If you hire out the work, and they suggest this method, throw them out of your house, burn their business card, and use a sharpie marker to blot out there name in every public phonebook you come across. Commonly refered to as a Jersey mud job, this method is highly prone to failure for several reasons. FIrst being the reduced contact between the thinset and the substrate allowing for easier shearing from the substrate, next being there is no way to reinforce the joints between sheets, overlapped, they are too high and butted together, the seems are going to move. Furthermore, the spacing on your joists IS too great. Add the ply as RD suggsted. Then you can use cement board over that, most have a spec for 19.2" oc spacing. I have personally ripped out several of these types of installations because of cracked grout and tile. Being RD is close to Jersey, I'll bet he has too, and I know Adanac has taken out a few. Funny how those that subscribe to this method always claim to never have a failure, but the method has always failed every test by trade organizations and is not approved by any trade organization or thinset manufacturer.
 
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Old 06-06-05, 03:28 PM
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Future, doesn't matter the size of the room being tiled, the flex between the joists is the same in a one ft. area as in 100.

And skimming a floor over lathe with thinset adds nothing as far as strength and should never be done, as Tilebri has pointed out.
 
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Old 06-06-05, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by R&D Tile

And skimming a floor over lathe with thinset adds nothing as far as strength and should never be done, as Tilebri has pointed out.
I don't frequent this site often, but wire lathe and thin set is the way ALL my builders want. In 15 years of doing business putting up new homes, I've always put wire lathe, staple it down with a compressor, skim it with what we (in Canada) call scratchcoat, and the next day it's ready for tiles. I can honestly say that I don't know of any ceramic tile company/installers, that don't put some mesh down when working over plywood.
 
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Old 06-06-05, 07:23 PM
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I bet they all want unmodified thinset too, (because it is less cost to them) I dont care what the builders want, they are not the tile pros, they look for the cheapest and quickest way out, not the right way. Your scratch coat method is not approved by any tile trade organization, as Tilebri stated, and as soon as you do it you give all manufacturers an out from under their warranty. The scatch coat method has been statistically proven to be the cause of many tile failures where the reasons for said failures were investigated and determined by certified independent flooring inspectors. Vinyl and luan under the tile is another biggie (see the post at the top of the page)
 
 

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