Colorbody versus glazed porcelain tile

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-31-05, 09:49 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Colorbody versus glazed porcelain tile

I am trying to replace vinyl in my kitchen and bathrooms with tile. Is colorbody porcelain better than glazed porcelain? How do they differ? Also is lead a big concern with porcelain tiles? Thank you for your time.
 
  #2  
Old 06-01-05, 03:34 PM
T
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 851
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Color through body is unglazed and if it chips, it will still look the same, except for the small chip.

Glazed ones have patterns to mimic stone and look great at doing it.

Never heard of lead problems or even if any lead is used anywhere in them.
 
  #3  
Old 06-01-05, 04:03 PM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Talk to us about what you are doing to rip out the vinyl. Certain steps need to be followed to prepare the subfloor for tile or no matter what you use it is doomed for failure. How big are the rooms, are they on wood or slab, whats under the vinyl? Just for starters.
 
  #4  
Old 06-01-05, 07:50 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks, I'll need help along the way.

Thanks for the response on the tile type. The vinyl is 7 years old, so I hope asbestos is not a problem. This is my first shot at tile or any flooring :-). So I am going to try the 30 sq. ft. powder room first. There is plywood under the vinyl...not sure how thick the plywood is. The vinyl seems to be stretched and stuck to the edges. What is the best way to remove this? How do I prepare the floor and how thick should the backer board be? I went to one of those tile laying clinics at HD/ Lowes...seemed tedious work, but not too hard...so I want to give it a shot.
 
  #5  
Old 06-01-05, 09:16 PM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the plywood under the vinyl is 1/4" it has to come out also. It offers only problems and no benefits in relation to a tile floor. Once you pull the toilet out of the powder room look down around the flange , hopefully you can see the thickness of the all the plywood layers there. Is there a hot air vent in the floor or some other pipe that will offer a view of the underside? Let us know what you have. The vinyl can be scraped up with a long handled scraper. Slash it with a utility knife making long score marks to help the scraper lift the vinyl. If there is 1/4" ply use a circular saw set to cut through the 1/4" ply and cut 2' squares then lift the ply and vinyl out together with a pry bar.
The backer board wont offer any structural support to the floor, only adding plywood will help with that in your case. With the proper amount of plywood down you could use a 1/4" cement board ( I know I said no 1/4" in the floor but that was in reference to plywood which can compress at 1/4" thickness, cement board wont, thats the difference.) The cement board offers a superior bond of the tile and thinset rather than setting directly on plywood.
 
  #6  
Old 06-08-05, 04:49 AM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Plywood is 3/4" thick.

The plywood seems to be 3/4" thick as far as I can see from the floor vent. So do I just slash the vinyl with a utility knife to remove it? I have removed the quarter round. Will try to remove the pedestal sink and toilet today. Any suggestions as to how to go about it.
After this, do I level the plywood subfloor and how to I prepare it for backerboard.
Also, I am a little confused about the backerboard...do I need to buy 1/4" cement backerboard and what do I need to know about installing the backerboard.
Once I get through this., I'll ask the next series of questions :-) Thanks a million!
 
  #7  
Old 06-08-05, 05:21 AM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A scraper, either long handled so you can stand up or a short one witha 4" blade on it(wallpaper scraper) should do. Wear gloves to protect from blisters. The 1/4" cement board (you do have 3/4" ply, right?) is set in a bed of combed thinset using a 1/4" notched trowel, then nail it with 1 & 1/4" galvanized roofing nails every 6" throughout the board, stay back 1" from the seams. If the floor needs to be leveled you should use Self Leveling Cement on top of the cement board, not before.
 
  #8  
Old 06-09-05, 11:32 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Removed vinyl

Our floor vinyl was stretched and stuck on the borders(seams) so it wasn't hard to slash and remove. Now I think I see luan plywood (pieces of it came out with the vinyl adhesive). My questions are:

1. Is it best to remove the luan layer so I can access the sub-floor (which tool would cause the least damage to the subfloor)?

2. Starting at the sub-floor, do I put a moisture barrier before putting the backer board? If yes, do I stick the moisture barrier to the sub-floor (I am doing the flooring in a bathroom) with a thinset mortar.

Thanks a bunch!
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-05, 05:02 PM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Remove the luan, it provides no benefit but lots of headaches in a tile installation (it absolutely, positively has to go). Set a circular saw to just make through the luan, cut 2 ft squares and lift with a pry bar. You may need pliers to pull the staples that dont come up with the luan.
Put a paint on waterproof membrane ( for example, Redgard at HD, Laticrete and Hydroment also make good ones) down over the cement board. You dont want to puncture it with any nails, that would defeat its purpose. The modified thinset will stick to it just fine. The membrane is not always needed on the bathroom floor, depends on how much water your family puts on the floor with showers, etc. It's good insurance but may not be a necessity.
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-05, 09:32 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Luan out, what next?

Ok, luan is out, staples removed and loose nails tapped in. Floor seems to be pretty level using a 2 ft. long level..is that enough? The next step is to get the 1/4" cement board, right? There seem to be different ones at HD/ Lowes...any suggestions as to which one is better ? Then do I spread thinset on the plywood underlayer floor and tap the cement board down with a rubber mallet? Do I then have to wait awhile for the thinset to settle before screwing the board to the plywood underlayer. And, what type of thinset do I get..sanded or unsanded(definitely, not premixed as you mentioned). Thanks for helping me along the way.
 
  #11  
Old 06-11-05, 05:16 AM
T
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 851
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
1/4" cement backerboard is installed over plywood only, you spread un-modified thinset on the floor with a 1/4" trowel, then set the board on it and screw it down every 6 to 8" throughout while still wet, continue till all the sheets are down, stagger the boards as you go and do not have a seam above a plywood seam below, now stay off the floor overnoght.

Now use modified thinset to set your tile and use backerboard tape only, not drywall tape to tape and thinset the seams while tiling.

Hope this helps.

I would ike to know what you have for a subfloor now and how many layers of what and how thick, joist size, spacing and length of unsupported span of the joists would help also.
 
  #12  
Old 06-12-05, 08:10 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Polymer-fortified thinset mortar

Awesome advice! Thank you.

I couldn't find latex fortified thinset (both at HD or Lowes), will a polymer-fortifed thinset mortar be okay? Couldn't find unmodified thinset either. Also, do I need to add any Additive to the thinset?

The sub floors are about 1 1/8 thick plywood. Dont know about the layers(there may be about 4-5)

The joists run from the front to the back of the house. They are about 1.5 inches thick (about 6 inches wide, I think) - they are spaced about 11 inches apart. The unsupported span is about 13 feet. Would you think I will need additional support for a room that extends across the unsupported span. Please let me know if you need more info about this. Thanks a bunch!
 
  #13  
Old 06-19-05, 03:41 PM
StyleNDesign
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Advice please...

Can someone repond to my earlier post. Also, someone suggested a pasty colored 1/4" Hardibacker is stronger than 1/4" Wonderboard on the floors...I am so confused...are they the same or different ?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: