New shower install

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Old 02-16-06, 06:59 PM
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Talking New shower install

I decided to skip the easy stuff and completly rip out a cheap plastic walk in shower to custom build a newer larger but odd shaped shower stall for my first ever tile job. I understand that I need to lay down plywood (.5"), 6 mil sheeting, cement board... and then use cement 'mud' to make a sloping shower basin? (green board on wall replacing sheetrock, 6 mil sheeting, cement board, then tile for walls) Is there anyone/where I can learn how to properly do this, or does anyone have any tips they would like to share?
I was told that I cannot use green board on the ceiling, Is this true?
Any help will be appreciated.
thanks
adventurous
 
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Old 02-17-06, 05:05 AM
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You will have to install an EPDM shower pan liner on the bottom and up on the walls about 8" or so, and install a special drain that accepts the rubber liner. Then you will have the proper base for tiling ensuring against a leak. Are you going to be tiling the ceiling? Since you are doing such a project, I would consider it, and installing a shower approved can light over it, then cover with cement board for the tile to adhere to.
You have taken on a daunting task, but I congratulate you on your boldness. I would check with the library, big box stores, etc. for books or articles which will give you more insight on what you have already starte. Good luck with the project!
 
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Old 02-18-06, 11:52 AM
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I did a lot of research into this subject when I was going to undertake a similar job. I've since installed a one piece fiberglass shower and was able to avoid the building of the shower pan and all. Although sometimes I think it may have been simpler to go that route as the fiberglass unit brought about a whole different set of challenges.

Anyway, here are a few links to some good sites about building your shower pan...good luck.

http://www.ontariotile.com/preslope.html
http://johnbridge.com/vbulletin/show...?threadid=5434
http://johnbridge.com/kerdi_shower.htm
 
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Old 02-19-06, 04:01 PM
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Pictures

Thanks for the advice, I love the picture tutorial!! I was actually going to do something a little more complicated, but this will work out great!
I will not be installing tile on the ceiling, but I was going to replace the drywall with green board. The shower is irregular in shape, due to a chiminey on one side and a finished wall on the other. A 30 degree (?) slope on the ceiling to ~4' prevents me from coming straight out, so the shower will open up after making a 90 degree (boxing the chiminey) turn into the main bath. I think that this prevents me from using any of the fiberglass prefabs. At least the ones that I looked at.
 
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Old 02-20-06, 05:52 AM
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Given the irregular shape, you might want to consider using Kerdi as your shower liner/drain/waterproofing. www.schluter.com-click products, then waterproofing membranes.
 
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Old 03-13-06, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by rcash54
I did a lot of research into this subject when I was going to undertake a similar job. I've since installed a one piece fiberglass shower and was able to avoid the building of the shower pan and all. Although sometimes I think it may have been simpler to go that route as the fiberglass unit brought about a whole different set of challenges.

Anyway, here are a few links to some good sites about building your shower pan...good luck.

http://www.ontariotile.com/preslope.html
http://johnbridge.com/vbulletin/show...?threadid=5434
http://johnbridge.com/kerdi_shower.htm
That first link is perfect for what we may need to do. But, I am surprised to see only the lining go over plywood flooring. Our shower pan is some kind of metal. Is this method standard for making shower floors?
 
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Old 03-13-06, 09:14 PM
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In that first post, you are not seeing the liner going over plywood. You are seeing roofing felt and reinforcing diamond lath going down. There are two layers of mud. The first layer provides a slope forthe liner. CPE membrane from Noblecompany gives a lifetime warranty. Lead and copper pans have about up to a 40 year life span but are usually installed without a slope, which is problematic and promotes mold and mildew and bacterial growth. Yum. Look around for either cpe or pvc membranes but also look for shower dam corners for the cuts at the curb. If you cannot find them at a big box or plumbing supply house, get your products online for cpe membrane at www.noblecompany.com or for schluter Kerdi products at www.tileprotection.com
 
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Old 03-13-06, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Tilebri
In that first post, you are not seeing the liner going over plywood. You are seeing roofing felt and reinforcing diamond lath going down. There are two layers of mud. The first layer provides a slope forthe liner. CPE membrane from Noblecompany gives a lifetime warranty. Lead and copper pans have about up to a 40 year life span but are usually installed without a slope, which is problematic and promotes mold and mildew and bacterial growth. Yum. Look around for either cpe or pvc membranes but also look for shower dam corners for the cuts at the curb. If you cannot find them at a big box or plumbing supply house, get your products online for cpe membrane at www.noblecompany.com or for schluter Kerdi products at www.tileprotection.com
Sorry, I saw the felt also and neglected to mention that. So the answer to my question is yes? This is the normal way that showers are constructed in this day and age?

I was very surprised to see what was done.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 12:11 PM
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Yes, this is the way showers are supposed to be constructed, but it's probably the most overlooked code. The tile shower drain actually has two drains. One on top for water shed off the tile surface and a subdrain, called weepholes where water that gets under the tile and grout can drain from the pan. No slope or clogged weepholes means no drainage under the pan. Water collects, stagnates, gets held against the wall where it can leach up, allows mold and mildew to grow. A sloped pan not only dries out, but even heavily used ones that would never get an opportunity dryout under the tile will always be fresh water within them. A properly constructed pan will have two layers of mud when a liner is used.
 
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