ASAP ?? Sanded or Unsanded grout on polish procelain Tile?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-22-06, 07:32 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
ASAP ?? Sanded or Unsanded grout on polish procelain Tile?

After installing the first room with rectified polished porcelain tiles (approximately 200 sq ft) and having the supplier give us confusing info on the actual cement to use to attach them to our concrete floor. I wonder if they were correct in telling me to use Unsanded Grout? I definitely don't want to have more additional obstacles.

If so, would this type of grout remove the wax like film protecting the polish porcelain as they mentioned to us? Or will we have to use something to remove it completely? some of the wax covering has removed already with the installation of the tile, but it still has some visible wax like substance on them.

Thanks again for the assistance!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-22-06, 08:17 PM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I dont understand what this wax film is all over the tiles. Anyway, what is the width of your grout joint? If under 1/8" use unsanded. With a rectified tile it should not be wider than this anyway. The size of the grout joint will dictate what type of grout you use and the type of tile will dictate the width of the joint. You cant use unsanded in a 1/4" joint and you cant use sanded in a 1/16" joint.
 
  #3  
Old 03-23-06, 07:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for that info. My grout width is 1/16" . So from what you say I should use unsanded grout in such a small grout line. Thanks again!!
 
  #4  
Old 03-24-06, 12:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Some porcelain tile manufacturers ship tile with coating to ease grout process and to act as grout release. Coating could be a weak sealer, grease, oil, or wax. It is recommended that the coating be removed after installation. There are coating strippers available. Read and follow directions carefully.
 
  #5  
Old 03-24-06, 02:59 PM
Bud Cline's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Central Nebraska
Posts: 1,300
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I doubt that "polished" porcelain would require any kind of a grout release and I also doubt that the manufacturer would spend the money. Any factory-applied grout release I have ever seen has been water-soluable and disappears during the grouting process. Usually factory applied grout release is reserved for quarry tile and even at that the desire for a factory applied release has to be specified at the time of the order.

Polished porcelain is pretty tuff stuff and you aren't likely to hurt it in any way during the installation process.

It wouldn't be unusual for the factory to apply some sort of a wax-divider material to keep the polished tiles from scratching one-another during transit but this is usually done in the form of dots or dollops or strings and these products are very easy to remove prior to grouting.
 
  #6  
Old 03-28-06, 10:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 16
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just completed the grout!

Thanks again Bud and all others! For sure it removed the thin layer of grease like coating with the grouting. Now they look great! Still need to touch up as some of the grout lines did not get filled completely, I must of wipe out some of the grout during the sponging process. Perhaps did it too soon. How long typically do you wait before removing some of the grout on the tiles?

Thanks again for any info provided!
 
  #7  
Old 03-28-06, 12:50 PM
Bud Cline's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Central Nebraska
Posts: 1,300
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
To put a specific time on when is the right time to clean grout after it is installed is almost impossible. There are too many variables from site to site.

Things that determine when the grout will be ready are things like: the brand of grout, the temperature of the water used to mix the grout, the type of substrate under the tiles (grout), the temperature of the substrate, the relative humidity of the area, the thickness at which the grout is mixed, the ambient room temperature, the type of tile. All of these things enter into the curing/drying process.

There is a chance that you can go over the low spots if you do it now before the grout has had too much time to cure. Just an idea.
 
  #8  
Old 03-28-06, 07:06 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 852
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It all depends on atmospheric conditions and whether or not it's a full moon.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: