Window in shower - Like many before me....

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Old 04-07-06, 07:41 PM
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Window in shower - Like many before me....

Hey All;

Like several other posts I've read, I have a window in my shower. However, the difference is that my house is brand new! I guess my architect made a bad call that we did not catch.

Anyway, here's my problem. I have a new anderson window in the shower which I want to tile around. The extension jambs have yet to be installed. I don't know if I should install the anderson jambs and just trim around with pvc trim then butt my tile up to the trim or should i try to do something more ellaborate that will be more durable.

So, how do I handle the jambs and then how do I handle the trim around the window?

For the jambs - I've tried looking at marble, but it will be too thick to set into the groove on the window. I've also considered installing the wood jambs and then tiling on top of them, but I think that will most likely turn out ugly.

For the trim - I don't mind tiling right up to the edge, but whater I do with the jamb would need to cover up the edge of my cut tiles. I can also try using pvc or foam trim as mentioned above.

Lastly, what should I use to apply these tiles around the window? Should I use a superflex thinset? And, how should I fill the voids between the framing and whatever jamb I go with? Should I stuff the area with thinset or just use fiberglass insultation?

Can someone please help!!!
 
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Old 04-07-06, 08:01 PM
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I'd suggest you forget using the wood extension jambs. Instead, insulate around the window (minus the jamb extensions) then apply durock right to the rough opening, shimming behind the durock with an appropriate thickness of underlayment in order to keep a nice consistant 3/8 to 1/2" reveal around the window jamb. Then apply your tile on top of the durock as normal so that you have a tile extension jamb that can be wiped down. It might not be a bad idea to slope the bottom extension jamb so that it drains to the inside, away from the window. That window is a penetration that will cause problems behind your tile unless it's done properly.

Good luck keeping varnish on that window. Spar urethane would probably hold up the best.
 

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Old 04-08-06, 05:37 AM
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Do as Xsleeper suggests, with using backer around the framed openning and sloped on the sill. When I've done this, I use a bead of polyuerethane sealannt on the backer edge before I set it up against the window.

You will have your vapor barrier behind the backer which will stop at the window's RO so once the backer is installed around the window framing, the backer needs to be waterproofed. Tape and thinset the backer seams and then use a paint on waterproofer specific to tile installations such as Redgard and extend it about 8" around the window. Tile around the window framing using bullnose tile to cover the cut edges of the tile meeting the window.

Use modified thinset for the entire installation, no mastics at all. At this point, you could also switch out to glass block if privacy could be an issue. Don't follow the "varnish on the window" comment unless there was another post about this elsewhere.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Tilebri
Don't follow the "varnish on the window" comment unless there was another post about this elsewhere.
I'm sure you know a lot about tile, but my area is windows. Here's an example of a product a homeowner might obtain:
http://www.minwax.com/products/protective/helmsman.cfm

How many windows have you finished and what product would you suggest? I'm not even 100% sure the window is wood, although most Anderson windows are. Here's the "other post": http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=258468
 
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Old 04-08-06, 07:19 AM
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That thread isn't by the OP, it's unrelated to this. In any case, if you must have a window in the shower, it should be vinyl, though I can see how a marine varnish would hold up on the window, I wouldn't warrant any wood in a shower. Windows in the tub surround are pretty common in the old Cape cods all built around the 40's and early 50's, you know, the first "prefab" type homes, though at this point, most windows have been switched out to aluminum or vinyl at this point. New construction wood window in a shower, that's a question that should have been raised before?

Perhaps it was a design change where it was just supposed to be a soaking tub and the change to make it a shower as well was made after the fact? A change like that wouldn't involve the arch, only the GC.

My area is not windows, but there would not be wood extension jabs in there. Period. Personally, I've switched out about 15. but I prefer to have homeowners get them done by siding/window outfits.

My suggestion was the whole thing, wrapped with cbu, waterproofed and tiled. Exactly what I do. Same as your suggestion, with the added advice of the waterproofing membrane over the cbu.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 08:09 AM
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Hey guys.

Great advice. As an FYI - it is a wood window. The architect drew it in. The bath is as designed. Unfortunately, it's a bad design. Shame is, had I realized it before the window was installed I would have opted for glass block. Now I feel like it would be a waste to rip the window out and mess up my new siding. Since it is a kids bathroom, I am assuming a remodel is in the 15 to 20 year timeframe .

With that said, in lay terms, I will be doing the following;

1. I will install 1/4 cement backerboard in place of the extension jambs. However, the person who installed backerboard on the walls cut the bacerboard to the window's rough opening. Can I just fill the void with stips of backerboard, then tape and apply redgard?

2. I will tape the joints (is there a generic backerboard tape?) and apply redgard for waterproofing.

Does that sound right to you guys?
 
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Old 04-08-06, 12:37 PM
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First, unscrew a cbu panel and make sure either roofing felt poly sheeting was installed over the studs. Furthermore, it should be unfaced insulation behind the moisture barrier on that exterior wall.

Back to the original question,
1. I will install 1/4 cement backerboard in place of the extension jambs. However, the person who installed backerboard on the walls cut the bacerboard to the window's rough opening. Can I just fill the void with stips of backerboard, then tape and apply redgard?

2. I will tape the joints (is there a generic backerboard tape?) and apply redgard for waterproofing.

Does that sound right to you guys?
Other than you should go with 1/2" backer for the jams if you can, sounds great. Once again, bagged modified thinset mixed with water for all you tile set in the surround. So, yes, tape and thinset the backer seams using backer tape. Looks like mesh drywall tape but it's alkali resistant so the tape doesn't deteriorate from the portland in the thinset.

About that other comment I made
Don't follow the "varnish on the window" comment unless there was another post about this elsewhere.
That was directed to Xsleeper, meaning "I don't understand the varnish reference" and thought you had another post about the window finish in another forum section. As for following his advice if the window sashes/framing needs a top coat, he'd know better what to use than I.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 03:50 PM
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Thanks again.

I'm off to the big orange box with my shopping list.

One last question if you have time, the window also has wood mullions. Would the Spar urethane be sufficient to protect the wood or should I use an oil based paint?

Thanks again for your time!
 
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Old 04-08-06, 05:21 PM
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My bad! What a difference one letter can make! Guess that's why we shouldn't be quick to take offense.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by gianni
Would the Spar urethane be sufficient to protect the wood or should I use an oil based paint?
Oil based paint and spar urethane would react similarly if water got behind the wood. They would both blister and peel. My point about using spar urethane was that it was the most durable of all clear finishes, as far as window trim is concerned.

In my opinion, a high gloss latex paint would be better on a window that could possibly be subjected to moisture, because it would allow vapor to evaporate from the wood in the event the wood became wet. Oil based paint might blister and peel. At the same time, oil paint has the ability to resist water, which is a desirable quality in this instance. The paint question would best be answered by a professional painter in the Decorating > Painting forum, so I won't attempt to compare apples to oranges.
 
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