terrified

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Old 06-10-06, 07:54 AM
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terrified

I have about 12 ceramic tiles that have cracked throughout the house 3 in entry,4 in kitchen,3-5 in dining room. I have enough tiles to replace the cracked ones but I am terrified that once I start to remove old tiles that I will have to replace the tiles throughout the home. I have never worked with tile but have put in dozens for wood floors. I know I have to break out old tiles and scrap off the thin set and replace them with new ones. The floor is concrete and also I have felt a few other tiles that seem to be spongy when walking on them Should they be replace at the same time??
 
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Old 06-10-06, 09:12 PM
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When you pull up the cracked tile there will most likely be a crack in the concrete right under the crack in the tile. If so then the crack is active and needs to be addressed first the new tile will soon crack too. A crack isolation membrane would have to be put over the full length of the crack and about the width of one and a half tiles on each side of the crack. Even though a membrane like the one from www.noblecompany.com would work, the problem is that even at 1/8" thick or less it will raise the tiles under it by that much compared to the surrounding ones that are not replaced. So you do ahve a can of worms here.

If there is no crack under the tiles then the cause is probably that the tiles are set tight to the perimeter walls and they exert pressure by pushing on the tiles as they expand with seasonal changes.

Sorry for the maybes and could be's but without seeing it and only going on the little you told us, there is no way to accurately diagnose what the problem is.
 
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Old 06-10-06, 09:20 PM
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Wow unusual that they should crack up on a concrete floor. My guess is that a good thinset was not used and is crumbling underneath. Especially if you have "spongy" spots or hear crunching when walking on some of them. I'm afraid there is no simple solution that I can think of. One way to test that theory is to replace a few broken ones normally (if you don't see a fault line) using a good modified thinset. If they don't break then probably it was botched with bad thinset or morter. Bob could also be right in there being a fault line under the broken tiles. Only way to find out is to take a look. It would be unfortunate to have to remove and redo the whole floor so I would definately eliminate all other posibilities first.
 
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Old 06-11-06, 09:50 AM
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When you go to remove a tile you have to dig out the grout surrouding it first to isolate it from the adjoining tiles. They sell grout saws which are tedious but do work. In addition try a carbide tipped scoring tool used to score and cut cement board, both tools are sold at HD in the tile section. You want the grout out for about 2/3 of its depth.
After that use a cold chisel and a hammer to break and scrape the tile into pieces and scrape it off the floor, always start near the middle of a tile and work out toward the edges so you dont ding a good tile.
 
 

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