Smooth Transitions (Ceramic Tile & Wood Floor)


  #1  
Old 07-30-06, 10:57 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smooth Transitions (Ceramic Tile & Wood Floor)

Hello everyone - thanks in advance, there are a lot of questions in this post!

I'm planning porcelain tile installation in my front entry, bathrooms, and kitchen. At the same time I am installing bamboo flooring in the rest of my house. My highest priority in doing this is that no transition is more than 1/32" - 1/16" different in height.

The wood flooring is 5/8" thick. I'm evaluating what thickness of plywood to use as an underlayment for it, and thus trying to calculate the exact depth of the tile installation. Please tell me if these numbers are correct (laid out from top to bottom):

3/8" Tile
3/16" Thinset (Assuming that the 1/4" x 1/4" combed thinset gets smushed down when setting the tile. Should this be a smaller/bigger number??)
1/4" Hardibacker
3/16" Thinset

Total = 1" depth, therefore 3/8" underlayment is necessary for wood flooring installation. Does this sound reasonable?

Other Questions:
1) Should I use thinset with acrylic latex? What are the benefits?
2) The Home Depot Tiling 1-2-3 book shows the installer using fiberglass tape over the joints of his backerboard. Is this necessary? I haven't seen it used anywhere else.
3) For bathroom floors, is the thinset at the joints of the backerboard enough to waterproof the installation?
4) I'm ordering Schlueter aluminum transitions to use at all hardwood/tile transitions. Allowing for the 1/4" of thinset and 3/8" of tile, what is the best depth of transition to use?
5) Schlueter Transitions: Will aluminum or stainless steel hold up better? Also, does it look better to butt the tile up against the transition, or to have a grout line between the tile and transition (they sell both types).

THANK YOU! I know this is a lot of questions...
 
  #2  
Old 07-31-06, 11:35 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
*bump*

I'd love to get some help on this - thanks!
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-06, 03:12 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,533
Received 9 Votes on 9 Posts
Howdy Uncle Jed - Jeez I always wanted to say that.

Before I can answer your questions about floor height I need more info. Tell me more info about the existing floor. What size are the joists, what is the on center spacing and what is the unsupported span of the joists from below? What do you currently have for a subfloor - plywood - osb? How thick is it?

1 Yes use a modified thinset that all ready has additive in the drymix. No need for the liquid additive here.
2 Yes you have to tape backerboard joints. You use the same modified thinset that you'll be setting the tile with to do this. Tape the joints as you tile, not before.
3 Thinset is not waterproof and neither is backerboard for that matter. If for some reason you need a waterproof installation there are membranes available for this. Most folks have no need to waterproof a floor though.
4&5 Havent used any of the schluter transition stuff so dont know. I usually use wood transition thresholds for this.

Sorry for the delay in answering your questions. Had to go to my real job today.
 
  #4  
Old 08-01-06, 09:20 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 30
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No worries - I appreciate the response.

I have a 3/4" plywood subfloor. I am planning to use 1/4" hardibacker with thinset and mechanical fasteners. From what I recall (I haven't had the subfloor exposed for a while, and haven't done any demo yet) the joists are spaced 12-16".

What I'm really trying to determine is the final depth of a layer of thinset so that I can have transitions without a 'bump' between flooring types. So from the combed 1/4", how much does the thinset 'smush down' under cement board, and how much does it get pressed down by tile?

#2 Response: To clarify, you're saying that I glue and screw down the backerboard, use thinset at the joints, let that dry, then lay tile and as I'm laying the tile have fiberglass tape at the joints which gets embedded in the thinset I'm using to set the tile?

Thank you very much!
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-06, 08:53 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,533
Received 9 Votes on 9 Posts
Jed

The thinset under the cement board will be a little less than 1/8". The thinset under the tile will be approx 1/8" could be a little more or a little less.

No glue. Thinset and screws. No thinset at the joints until you tile. Then thinset the joints, tape the joints and tile at the same time. If you tape the joints earlier the thinset dries creating high spots (speed bumps) that make it difficult to set the tile flat.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: