Ceramic versus Porcelain Tile

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-03-06, 03:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ceramic versus Porcelain Tile

Floor in kitchen and laundry rooms to be retiled, after removing existing ceramic tille. Have looked at both ceramic and porcilan tiles with grades of IV for hardness. Porcilan is more expensive, but is it more durable? Present tiles cracked in some places due to soil shift under house. Have had house leveled, but concerned about using most durable tile product available. Any help appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-04-06, 12:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Any movement in subfloor will cause cracked grout and possibly cracked tiles, whether ceramic or porcelain. Ceramic tiles have a kiln-fired glaze over red or white clay. They are usually softer and easier to cut than porcelain tiles. Porcelain tiles are made from porcelain clay that has been pressed and kiln-fired. Color goes all the way through. Porcelain clay is very dense and has a low absorption rate, so the tiles are frost proof and can be used outdoors. Porcelain tiles are more durable than ceramic tiles from the standpoint of wear.
 
  #3  
Old 08-04-06, 08:17 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,392
Received 59 Votes on 55 Posts
I'm a porcelain guy myself. only because the color goes all the way through and chips do not always necessitate replacing the tile. Any shifting of the foundation can crack either one, so I would use vinyl until the foundation is trustworthy.
 
  #4  
Old 08-04-06, 12:04 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks folks, very helpful. House was leveled 15 years ago, and I believe that shifting has all but stopped. Will make sure floor is leveled well before installation. Any other hints appreciated.
 
  #5  
Old 08-04-06, 12:40 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Where the cows roam, CA
Posts: 2,204
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I thought this information would help you out some more

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/diffceramicporcelain
 
  #6  
Old 08-06-06, 06:13 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hvae purchased tile and asked for bids from several companies. Talking to several salesman, I have been told that we should have a membrane material used over concrete floor, use a Thinset "Ultra Flex II", use a 1/4 inch separation between tiles, and seal the grout several time after completion. Any comments appreciated? Thanks, Phil.
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-06, 08:45 PM
Tileguybob's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 931
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The membrane will protect the tile from horizontal cracks that occur in the concrete floor. If there is any new cracking that occurs it would be a good idea to use one. Look at www.noblecompany.com for a type of membrane to be used. If a crack is vertical shear, where one side of the crack ends up lower than the other side then no membrane of any kind on the market will help and you should look to use some other type of flooring. The Ultra is made by Mapei, a good company and a good product. You could also use FlexBond from Custom or Full Flex from Tec, both just as good.
 
  #8  
Old 08-10-06, 06:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just got a bid to do tile job. Since cracks appear to be a widening action versus up/down motion, they have proposed to use a plastic layer under the tiles called "Dietre Scheuter". Cost of material and labor to install just this under coat is about $900.. Any thoughts on this?? Thank you.
 
  #9  
Old 08-10-06, 07:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,502
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Schluter Ditra is a good choice if the cracks are as you say
widening action versus up/down motion
. If one side of the crack is higher that the other then Ditra wont help.

I don't know the size of your floor or where you are located so I can't really say if this is reasonable or not. I can tell you Ditra aint cheep and you have the added time and materials of installing it. Its good insurance in your case.
 
  #10  
Old 08-10-06, 11:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks HeresJohnny. Looked up Schluter-Ditra on internet and found it sells a 150 sqft2 roll for $198. Job here consists of about 300 sqft. What does the "2 roll" mean? Is this adequate for 300 sqft? Thanks again.
 
  #11  
Old 08-10-06, 12:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 3,502
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Phil

If you found one 150ft roll at $198 thats a good price. I'm sure thats not the price for two rolls though if thats what your thinkin.

I've purchased ditra from these people on line in the past. Good service and price.
http://www.tile-experts.com/products.asp?id=67

The local HD's are now selling Ditra as well so you can probably check it out there.
 
  #12  
Old 08-10-06, 12:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 50
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
tile on front porch

Looking to put tile on my front porch. It will not be flush with my driveway, so is there some sort of outdoor caulk I can run along the edge of the tile to finish it off and that won't chip away?
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: