ceramic tile question

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  #1  
Old 01-11-07, 11:12 PM
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ceramic tile question

I have sky blue 4" ceramic tile in my bathroom that goes half way up the walls and up to the ceiling around the tub, there is also a black 4" tile border around the top and bottom of the wall tiles. The floor is also blue tile! Pardon me for saying so but my bathroom is ugly, and I hate it!!!

So my question is, is it possible to paint the tile going up the walls?? I really don't want to go through tearing all the tile out and replacing it, I don't have the time to do that. If I can paint it should I remove the grout and re-grout after painting?

Another question- Can I put sticky back vinyl tiles on top of my existing tile floor?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!
 
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Old 01-12-07, 07:17 AM
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Any painted tile Ive ever seen looks like crap. I dont know how else to say it. Addtionally, it would stand no chance for survival in a shower, none whatsoever. My suggestion would be to live with the color until such time as you are prepared to replace the tile. As to the floor, maybe someone with vinyl experience can chime in here. Id think that the grout lines would telescope through the vinyl tiles though. When considering going over a tile floor with another floor you need to consider the condition of the floor. Are there any cracks in the floor, loose tile, cracked grout?
 
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Old 01-12-07, 07:54 AM
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I agree with Heresjohnny, I've never seen painted tile that held up. It doesn't take long before it looks worse than it did originally. The vinyl tiles, however, are doable. I have no use for those peel and sticks personally, but someone must like them or they wouldn't make so much of it. Johnny's concern over grout joints telegraphing is half the potential problem. The other half is breaking, cracking, and looking nasty in short order. Vinyl tiles are not as flexible as sheet vinyl and will crack or break in the places the grout joints dip down because there's a void that allows the tile to flex too much. If you go this route, you'll need to thoroughly clean the floor, especially the grout joints, to remove any contaminants that would create bonding issues, and then float the floor with Ardex featheredge or Mapei Planipatch to fill in the grout joints. These products are floor patch materials, made for that purpose, and both work well. Be very careful, in the spreading process, to get it as flat and smooth as possible because it dries pretty hard and will be difficult to deal with after the fact. Once it's dry, use the flat edge of the trowel to scrape or cut down any blobs, drips, or ridges you may have missed in order to get the floor smooth and flat. The next and last step to the prep is to clean the floor again. All dust and scrapping debris must be removed. The amazingly smallest things will eventually break through the vinyl tiles with time and traffic so be fussy about this step. Dust is the enemy here. You want to be fastened to the floor, not a layer of dust. Don't use cleaning chemicals. A damp mop or rag will do for the final dusting. Once the floor is level, smooth, clean, and dry, go for it.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 07:34 PM
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Ok so sounds like I should not paint the tile which works for me.

So, is removing the tile and replacing it with new tile a huge, time consuming job? Will the tile come off easily or is it a big pain? I realize it will be messy, dusty, and the like but can I manage removing it over a weekend or do I need more time?

Thanks
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-12-07 at 10:58 PM. Reason: Removed nonprogressive language
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Old 01-12-07, 09:51 PM
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Without seeing what you're dealing with, that's hard to answer. My first instinct would be, sure, it's doable in a weekend, especially if it wasn't installed properly to begin with. I can normally pull up a pretty good sized area in a few hours work, but I've done lots of it and am physically used to it. But even someone who hasn't done it before should be able to demo a bathroom floor in a weekend. I wouldn't count on being able to get a new floor back down in that same weekend though. One question. Have you considered one of the no glue sheet vinyls for this floor? They have a different backing than the felt backed, full spread glued vinyl does, are far more forgiving of floor prep than vinyl tiles or felt back sheet vinyl, and are very easy to install. The basic prep would be the same as previously described with the exception of the dust. Since the stuff isn't glued, dust isn't such an issue. This kind of floor could be finished and the bathroom back in operation in a weekend easily.
 
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Old 01-12-07, 10:30 PM
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Actually I will be doing all the tile that goes half way up the walls throughout and the tub surround that goes up to the ceiling. I plan on covering over the tile on the floor instead of busting it up. My bathroom is pretty small, 2 people is a crowd.

I only plan on re-tiling the surround and not the walls, just leaving them sheetrock, which im guessing I will have to replace since there will be stuff left from the tile I cant remove. Will I be able to put new tile up in my shower after I remove the old tile? Or will I need to replace what is underneath first?

I believe the tile I have now was installed correctly as it has been there since the house was built in the '50s and its in good shape no cracks or anything like that.
 
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Old 01-13-07, 12:14 PM
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If the shower has lasted that long, there are some really dirty folks running around or it was, as you pointed out, most likely done correctly. The method back then was a mud set and it was built to last. The likelihood of being able to remove the tile without having to replace what's behind it is fairly slim. Someone else had the same thing going on a while back and tried to save part of it but finally had to go back to the studs and start over. I tried to find the thread so you could read their experience and was unsuccessful.
 
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