Corner Tiles and When to Grout Floors?

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Old 02-28-07, 09:23 AM
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Corner Tiles and When to Grout Floors?

So I did ceramic tile floors before, and I did ceramic tile walls, but never both in the same room. So, my first question is, when should I grout? I finished the floor a week ago. Should I grout the floor before I tile the walls or should I tile everything first and then grout? It might not make a difference, but I figured the pros have a preference for one reason or another.

My second question is, when you tile inside corners, should you tile the first wall right against the ajacent wall and then butt the next wall of tiles against those? Or should you leave a space between the end tiles and the wall, forming a "V" where the two walls meet?

Diving in this weekend so any help would be great! Thanks!
 
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Old 02-28-07, 01:34 PM
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Grout the floors before you do the walls. You'll be walking all over the floor while your doing the wall work. Grout helps to fill underneath the edges of the tile and support the egdes of the tile. Grout also makes the entire floor more stable. Cover the floor with a good heavy drop cloth or cardboard while you are working on the walls.

As far as the inside corners on the walls, tile into the corner leaving about an 1/8" between the tile and the wall. Then on the other wall, leave a small gap (1/16" to 1/8") between the tile and the tile on the first wall. The inside corners get caulked, not grouted. The two walls will move independently and grout would crack, so caulk is used here. Most grout manufacturers make color matched caulks for their grouts. The caulks come in sanded and non sanded to match the texture of the grout. The color matching is not always perfect, so minimizing the size of the joints to be caulked makes it less noticeable.

I normally do the walls first, so I dont have to be concerned with damaging a newly tile floor. But you have already tiled the floor, so do as above.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 05:39 AM
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Great! thanks for the help, as you answered both of my questions perfectly. I did the floors first because the cove piece I bought has to go over top of the end floor tiles (as the tile shop guy told me).
 
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Old 03-02-07, 07:03 AM
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You're in good hands Pete, Johnny gave you all the right stuff. I'd like to add one little thing. The rules for caulk versus grout are, angle or plane changes and material changes. Different planes or surfaces, such as a wall to a floor, a side wall to a back wall, a backsplash to a counter top, and so on, will move independently of each other. Grout is not flex friendly and will crack and fall out with any movement. As Johnny pointed out, every color grout made has a corresponding caulk made to go with it to be used instead of grout in these areas. In addition to the wall to wall joints, caulk where the walls and floor meet and where the walls and ceiling meet. I like to do all the caulking first, let it dry, and then grout. The caulk will dry darker than the grout and this method lets the caulk pick up some of the grout pigment and blend a little better. Also, wood and tile have dramatically different expansion and contraction rates so anywhere they meet gets caulked.
 
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