Removing Marble Tile....there has to be a better way?!

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Old 03-23-07, 07:06 PM
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Removing Marble Tile....there has to be a better way?!

I am in the process of laying ceramic tile throughout the front of my home. This includes a foyer, 2 formals, a hallway and powder room.
My problem right now is, removing the marble tile from the foyer. I will also have to face this with the powder room eventually.
There HAS to be a better way of getting it up other than chipping away at it with a chisel? At this rate it's going to take me a month just to get the marble out to begin ceramic.

The marble seems to be 1/4" thick, guesstimated, and it has a thick layer of gray adhesive under it, I'm guessing 1/8" guesstimated, and it sits on a concrete base.

My hands are all cut up because it's just sharding like glass! My son finally came in this afternoon and just started beating it with the hammer, but even that's a slow process and it flies everywhere!

Anyone have any recommendations for me? I'm not new to tiling, but I am new to removing marble. The guy at Home Depot sold me on a shovel looking thing called a "floor bully". A total waste of $30 in my opinion!

Help please?
 
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Old 03-23-07, 07:47 PM
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Right store, wrong department.

Go into the tool rental area and get a Hilti demolition hammer. It should have a 2 or 3" spade on the front of it. That baby will take the place of your manual effort. well, maybe not all of it, you still have to hold the machine which can get heavy after awhile, but frequent breaks to clean up will help. Have your son and some of his friends handy to fill buckets with the broken tile and get them out of the way and out of the house.
 
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Old 03-23-07, 08:22 PM
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Totally agree with TileGuy.

It's WELL worth the rental fee.
 
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Old 03-23-07, 08:33 PM
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Over the years here, most folks tend to recommend renting a pneumatic chisel for removing large areas of tile.
 
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Old 03-24-07, 07:13 AM
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Thanks guys. I'll give that a try.
 
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Old 09-14-08, 08:33 AM
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Unhappy removing old crazy cut marble design from our interior flooring

I am having the same problem as Stacey however someone suggested that I use chipping hammer. Is this the best power tool to buy? I am also in dilemma which brand to buy and what model. Recently, I went to Home Depot and they showed me 2 powered tools namely: Euro Power tools which is twice cheaper than Dewalt. They have no Bosch. With Dewalt they have several models can you tell me which one is a good buy? I don't want to buy an expensive and I don't want to buy the cheapest either. All i want is practical, it has several usage, and cheap. Please help!
 
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Old 09-14-08, 08:36 AM
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You can rent a demolition hammer from HD, you dont have to spend the money to buy one.
 
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Old 09-24-08, 01:41 AM
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Thanks Johnny however we don't have the tool being rented out in my area. I planned to have mine rented after use. I just don't know if I include the labor cost to the rent. It's very expensive tool to just have it rented without having someone watching over or operating the tool. Does HD have the kind of tool being rented out without the labor cost to include?
 
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Old 09-24-08, 03:07 PM
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Monique

Try again, I don't have a clue what you are asking. Are you saying you will buy a demo hammer and then rent it out to others? If so what labor will be associated with the rental of the tool? Will you be doing the demo for others as well? I'm confussed.
 
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Old 10-11-08, 12:03 AM
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Question pneumatic tool

sorry for the glitch, I also have trouble discerning it too. I have so many things on my mind. Anyway,I went to home depot inquiring about the tool to remove the crazy cut design marble flooring. They suggested me to purchase a chipping hammer. They do not rent out tools. That's why i am forced to buy and probably have it rented out after my operations in my house. I probably use the same tool to remove the pebble washed out in our garage that has a long crack. Anyway, with so many brands, Dewalt, Makita, Bosch, Power seal and so many models, I was in deep awe with what brand to buy. I understand Dewalt doesnt use SDS. Is buying a tool using SDS a practical tool? I will need to realize how long is the resting period of the powered tool. There is another tool called Ergonomical Advanced Design (EAD). from the internet. It weighs only 3.68 lbs. lighter. Are you familiar with this?I want something that is not too heavy, not too expensive and not too cheap either. I will be the one operating it too. I'd probably get help when the scope is wider. What brand and model should I buy? Thanks for your patience.
 
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Old 10-11-08, 11:21 AM
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I can't recommend any specific brand or model but a couple of suggestions when doing this.

#1- you should use the widest chisel blade available and use it under the tiles. You would have to use it on top of a first one to remove it but after that, you should drive is under the tiles. This will result in the fastest removal for the least work. It will also prevent damage to the concrete substrate if you chisel too deeply.

#2- gloves. Leather gloves. as stated previously, the broken pieces can be very sharp

#3 and THE MOST important; face and eye protection. Safety GOGGLES (not just glasses) are strongly recommended. A full face shield (I would suggest in conjunction with the goggles) will help prevent flying shards from cutting your face.
 
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Old 10-12-08, 06:21 AM
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pneumatic hammer

Thank you so much for that quick response. A full face shield it is. I'll buy that later on. Btw, will the face shield protect me from the noise? Is the old headphone used in the internet cafe can be applied in my work or is it different from the hardware? What about the SDS? Am so glad you have this diy website. From my end, I can hardly talk to anyone regarding this passion I have. I can't even share this with my girlfriends. Tnx again.
 
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Old 10-12-08, 09:55 AM
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ear protection would be a good idea as well. earphones (speaker type) are not designed to limit sound transmission (neccessarily). They do and would be better than nothing but you can pick up disposable ear plugs designed for the job for a couple bucks/pair or a pair of headphones designed to block sound for around $15.

SDS:
SDS (or Slotted Drive System) bits for hammer drills/rotary hammers allow the bit to slide in the chuck and enhance the hammering action of the tool. For most applications, these bits provide plenty of torque.



the uppper end with the slots is what is referred to concerning the SDS. It is more or less, a standard for the drive end of tools such as this so one can go to a hardware store and buy an SDS drill, chisel, or whatever and know it will fit their SDS tool. There are other methods to allow the same action. I wouldn't get too caught up in this SDS thing. It is pretty much the standard on smaller impact tools. There is also SDS max which is similar but utilizes a larger shank. Just be sure whatever tool bit you get is compatible with the tool you have.
 
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Old 10-12-08, 05:44 PM
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sds

Wow, I've never seen an SDS up close. All I know was the time the salesman showed the difference between the Dewalt and the SDS tool for another brand but never this close. Okay one more question, i have to make sure that everything will be alright when I start drilling. To my knowledge, I will have to go as deep as 1/2"just below the tile. Am i right? Wow tnx again.
 
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Old 10-12-08, 06:34 PM
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You won't be drilling.

If you have at least a section of the tile off now, you will see the marble and then whatever was used to adhere the marble to the concrete. Aim for that from the side with a chisel blade. You won;t be parallel with the floor but you want to keep it tilted as much as you can. The chisel will be driven under the marble which will lift it.

If you don;t have any tile off yet, just chisel straight down until one of the tiles breaks. Then work towards the angled position.
 
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Old 10-13-08, 05:19 PM
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I have an idea now.

With all this details i gathered, I would've built a big library for compiling all the things I learned here. I will let you know how I finished the project by myself. My next plan is to canvass the right ceramic tile that is as tough as marble tile. If there is any. If there isn't then I'm back with marble tile. Again many tnx.
 
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