slate tile on outdoor covered deck?

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  #1  
Old 10-19-07, 11:47 AM
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slate tile on outdoor covered deck?

OK, I was initially going to ask for several pieces of advice in the process of laying the slate tiles, but I think I had better start at the beginning first.
Outdoor covered deck, 14x16 exposed on 2 sides only, 2x12 joists, 16" spans, with 1" of greenboard/treated plywood on top. Mostly south facing, North Idaho. Should I even attempt slate (raja multicolor), 12x12's on this? Obviously, I would preseal them, but it sounds like the freeze/thaw issues would make me an unhappy person, no matter how much I want to seal/waterproof barrier, etc. Although I REALLY want slate, I REALLY don't want to do it over again when my slate flakes and blows away in the breeze.
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Old 10-19-07, 10:03 PM
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Sounds like a guaranteed failure to me. First question; although you say it's covered, the deck still needs to be sloped 1/4" per ft., is it?

Jaz
 
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Old 10-19-07, 10:31 PM
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Not even close to that. It is essentially level. It is enclosed by the walls of the house on 2 sides, and a deck with a hot tub on it with a 5' roof overhang on the 3rd side. One side is open (18" overhangs). It CAN'T be sloped, without a remodel that ain't going to happen. I have decided to use porcelain tiles, by the way. To many posts, like your reply, that warn against slate. I still have the slope problem, and am not sure what to use for products in general, so let's hear it. The tiles I like are 16x16 or 18x18. As I stated before, 3/4" treated plywood over 16"oc 2x12's, on a 14x16 covered outdoor deck. I CANNOT put another layer of plywood down, unless I want a substantial fall into my garage man-door. The outside TOP of the current metal threshold is just over 3/4" from the top of the current plywood (minimal gap under the threshold). The plywood is essentially level, maybe minimal dips (enough to show water marks at the centers, not the seams, after a driving rain that gets under the eves). I can easily sand down a couple of the seams a small amount.

Which product do you recommend-Wonderboard 1/4" or Hardibacker 1/4"?
Do I need a layer of thinset above AND below the backer?
Do I need to add in the height and cost of something like Ditra to waterproof, or is there another product that is thinner and adequate (if I need anything)?
How do I need to finish the one exposed edge of the deck? I have seen the products from schluter, but don't which one to use and how to use it to edge finish. This edge is the only one that has all of the layers exposed to the world.
thanks
rick
 
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Old 10-19-07, 10:57 PM
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It's not going to work. You must have the slope. You can raise the door without too much trouble. Then create a slope with long wedges, or remove the pt and sister new joists to the ones there to make the slope, or do a mud job.

You cannot use pt plywood as the subfloor, it's very unstable. Hardi cannot be used outside. Many other factors that aren't right here. Deck/wall joint needs to be waterproofed with flashing or Kerdi. Lots more details for now.

How about the joist? What is the unsupported span?

Jaz
 
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Old 10-19-07, 11:09 PM
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The unsuported span is about 13'6". Exactly how do you raise a metal door and doorjam, without ripping off the trim, then the jam, then cutting the drywall and replacing the jam higher? I think I would rather go with no slope, since raising it means I get to raise my siding, as well as redoing the step inside of the garage that gets to the man-door. If I can't use "greenboard" treated plywood, do I get to rip that off too!?
rick
 
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Old 10-19-07, 11:34 PM
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What is wrong with just having a deck? I do not want to undermine your project, but it's just so much worry, work, and money, and time invested in a project that will likely fail in the long run.

Believe me, the slope is important on decks and porches. Whoever installed the deck at my mountain cabin did not provide for a slope. Over the years the standing rain and melting snow puddles have taken its toll.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 01:45 PM
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This is not gonna work. Even with porcelain. As Jazman pointed out you need the slope. Additionally, you need two layers of plywood, then cement board, and then a membrane like noble deck. You could make a mud bed for your slope but youll still need the two layers of ply and noble deck. If you havent got the room for that kinda height then its not gonna work.

How long has that treated lumber and ply been there? That stuff shrinks and moves like all heck. If its been there for a year or so it may be ok.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 02:07 PM
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It has been there for a full year, and no gaps, etc at the seams are being seen so far.
 
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