Concrete Floor Tiles

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Old 03-26-08, 11:18 AM
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Concrete Floor Tiles

I have found a company online that sells molds for making tiles out of concrete, resin or other product. I was thinking of making concrete floor tiles, acid staining them individually, sealing them and using them as a cost savings over stone tiles. I was wondering if this would work. I know you can have solid concrete floors but I have seen nothing about individual concrete tiles. If it can be done would you grout them as you would with any tile?

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Old 03-26-08, 12:32 PM
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Concrete Floor Tiles

They probably could be grouted after sealing, depending on the quality of the concreter and sealers. I would contact the mold suppliers to see if they can offer you some specific recommendations on the concrete mixes, acid staining and sealers.

This will give you an opportunity to find out more and whether the company is just interested in peddling a few molds or providing assistance on producing a reasonable quality tile.

Anyone can make concrete tiles in any mold, but you need the right materials, proper proportions and the correct process and timing to make something that looks good and lasts.
 
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Old 03-26-08, 01:57 PM
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I saw somewhere recently where something like over 3 billion square feet of tile is sold annually in the U.S.

Why is it (do you suppose) none of it is made of concrete?

Just curious!
 
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Old 03-26-08, 02:06 PM
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How deep are these molds? How thick would these finished "concrete tiles" be? I'd be curious to know what info the mold manufacturer tells you.

All the nice tile made today with so many many choices, how come you wanna make your own?
 
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Old 03-26-08, 02:17 PM
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Concrete Floor Tiles

Clay tile is more common because of tradition and the U.S. market is not big enough for American concrete products producers to bother with tile. In Europe, especially in Spain and Italy it is a big part of the market (terazzo, antiqued, etc.). It is really quite easy to make a high quality concrete tile, but there is little profit incentive.

The U.S. brick business business is changing from 100% clay to clay and concrete with few people realizing the difference. - It is much easier to reproduce and match brick with concrete than with clay, since the clay deposits are limited and change with locations. If you want a variable appearing product, everything is easier.

Three billion square feet of tile is not really that much. China annually produces 535,000,000,000 brick just for walls and the clay/concrete tile floors enclosed are added to that. There are individual cities in India that use more brick than the entire U.S in a year.

If the U.S. was similar to the rest of the developed world, the use of tile would be much higher, but we use too much lightweight (wood) temporary construction for the detrement of ecology.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 07:50 AM
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Concrete vs. purchased tile

There are plenty of beautiful options for tile out there but with flat, square slate and travertine running about $4 - 14/ sq ft (and of course the most beautiful tile with natural character is the most expensive) I could save money by creating my own concrete tile. Concrete is much cheaper (I think), I have a bit of artistic ability (to do acid staining) and the molds come in various shapes with designs built in. This type of tile is much more expensive per individual piece (now you're talking $10 - $15 and up per piece). I can create many of them at a fraction of the retail cost. You can see all the pieces they have here at moldcreations.com. My concerns are using these concrete tiles in the bathroom where they will be in contact with water often. I have read some posts on concrete mixes and I had no idea there were so many. For domestic use, indoors like I have mentioned what kind of concrete mix would you use?
 
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Old 03-27-08, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by HeresJohnny View Post
How deep are these molds? How thick would these finished "concrete tiles" be?
For domestic use, indoors like I have mentioned what kind of concrete mix would you use?
You havent answered the questions. If its like 1/4" or 3/8" molds, I dont think any kinda concrete can be poured that thin in a mold and last without cracking. Maybe somebody else has some ideas.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 11:39 AM
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I thought providing a URL to the actual product would be more helpful so all could look it over but specifically, the tile molds I would use for the floor are 2" thick. The molds for wall tile are 1/4" thick.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 12:04 PM
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Right on the same site, they give you recipes to use in molds.

http://www.moldcreations.com/Recipes...molds-s/67.htm
 
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Old 03-27-08, 12:15 PM
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Yes, but I am ignorant as to hypertufa and aggregates or lightweight concrete and which is best for a cement tile bathroom floor and if that is even a good idea. I wanted to see if anyone had any experience with this.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 12:24 PM
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2" thick tiles. I hope this is a concrete slab you are installing thses on.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 12:34 PM
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You don't want to use hypertufa, that is a novelty product for making flower pots.

The 2" molds you are looking at are for stepping stones not floor tile. I nosed around that website and they have some pretty nifty stuff.

The recipe you want would contain sand and Portland cement only. That's going to be your least expensive way to go which is what you are looking for.

Personally I think you are barking up the wrong tree with this idea. Two inch thick stones on your interior floor would be a disaster and anything thinner made of cement wouldn't hold up for long.

Look at a nice ceramic floor tile.
 
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Old 03-27-08, 01:05 PM
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Good to know! Haha, flower pot material on my floor! So why are people using concrete as a flooring material these days if it's bad or is it just the idea of 2" thick concrete tiles that is bad. What would make a travertine tile ok where a concrete tile is not? If it's not good for the floor, would the walls be ok, say, a ceramic on the floor and thin cement tiles on wall or plaster tiles even (not sure how that would look but I'd be willing to investigate)?
 
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Old 03-27-08, 02:58 PM
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You are missing the point!

Cement tiles are around, they have been around for years, centuries. BUT, to make your own cement tiles isn't feasible. Cement tiles are pressed under very high pressure, this is where they get their strength.

If you were to make them you wouldn't be able to press them. Then they must cure before they can be effectively handled to be installed. This takes thirty days. How many tiles do you need and how many molds do you think you want to buy?

Travertine is also pressed. It has been under pressure for millions of years. Travertine is a natural stone.

You do what you want but I personally don't think you want to make your own cement floor tiles.
 
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