Need "Filler" Material For Floor.. Ideas?


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Old 04-04-08, 06:44 AM
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Need "Filler" Material For Floor.. Ideas?

I have a 1950's style home that has hard-wood floors in all areas except the kitchen & bathrooms. At the time my house was made, they did not recess the areas that were going to have hard-wood floors-they simply "raised up" the bathroom floors by adding 3"-4" of mortar to try and level the surfaces.

In my master bath, when I busted up the old tile-the mortar sub-floor that was built up became busted as well and I had to remove it all down to the slab. Then I had the unenviable task of hand mixing and laying a mortar bed to get it back up to level with the adjoining floor.

I have now moved on to my guest bath, and find the same problem. What I want to know is if there is a material that I can put down to take up some of the "space" so that I don't have to mix so much mortar to bring the floor back up. My guest bath is TWICE the size of my master bath, and the master bath took 10 bags of mortar, and 50 bags of sand!!!!

My thoughts are if I can build the floor up to about 3", and then make a mortar bed that is 1" thick on top of my built up base.

I though about using backer-board but at only 1/2" thick, it would take quite a bit to get the 3" height considering the size of the space. Plus, backer board is not cheap at $10 + tax for a 3'X5' piece.

Can I use regular scrap plywood, or particle board to fill the space in first, or would this be an issue with wood rot and make an unstable sub-floor later on?

If I can use wood, or particle board, I would use a floor leveler first, then before it dries, lay the wood into it so that it would be glued down, then nail, or screw each additional piece down until I have reached the height that I need, then top it with a mortar bed that it would be at least 1" thick across the entire surface.

Come on pro's-what do you do in this situation?
 
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Old 04-04-08, 07:10 AM
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i'd avoid all wood in the bath

But then, I live in s. FL the rot capital. I would pump in concrete. Especially in a ground floor bathroom..
 
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Old 04-04-08, 01:02 PM
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When you say "pump" it in, are you referring to calling in a cement truck and having them pump it in?

The area is only 8X10, I think an actual truck might be excessive. The other option of me mixing, and then carrying it in the house, or loading it all through the window is not a good option either.

I would think that if the wood is encapsulated in mortar, that it would not get additional moisture.. Am I all wet on this?

Heck, at this point, I could see myself buying the 1" thick brick pavers and putting them down to fill up the void. I think this would help to keep the number of wheel barrel mixes down to 20 or less.
 
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Old 04-04-08, 03:22 PM
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encased plywood, is encased rot

80sf and 3" is 20cf of concrete. 33 80# bags, about $165. get it delivered.

I'd rent a mixer, mix it indoors (maybe), hire a laborer at $10/hr (my local rate).
Bricks will rock a bit, so will need to be mortared down anyway. The choice is to carry bricks and glue them down, or carry bags of cement and have it not ever rock. The top 1/2" could be SLC and now its level.

I'm still thinking concrete

Much more that that amount, you would hire a concrete pump crew, and yes, it would pump in thru the window thru a hose. There would be some concrete splash with the hose that you should prepare for.

Any wood product doesn't make my list of options for grade level work.
 
 

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