Tile over brick floor


  #1  
Old 05-01-08, 07:47 AM
J
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Tile over brick floor

Hi,

My house was built in 1964, and it has a brick floor. At first, I thought the floor was covered with those thin, brick-shaped tiles, but examination inside a hole left by a removed swinging door reveals that the bricks are full thickness.

Needless to say, the bricks are dated, and I want to apply tile over them. However, over the bricks, and the 1/2" sandy mortar between them is a shiny coating of something. It looks thin, so I'm guessing it's some sort of sealer. Can I put thinset on top of this, or will I have to do some sort of prep work? I've tiled before, but never over sealed brick.

Also, on a related note, I am constantly seeing tutorials, books, and television shows where tile is simply lain over the existing floor, yet no one ever talks about the increased height of the floor. How do you deal with that? The floors in the house are all at the same height right now. For instance, the brick transitions to the tile in our sunroom right now with no change in height. And what about doors? What will I need to do to compensate for the higher floor?
 
  #2  
Old 05-02-08, 09:01 AM
H
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Needless to say, the bricks are dated, and I want to apply tile over them. However, over the bricks, and the 1/2" sandy mortar between them is a shiny coating of something. It looks thin, so I'm guessing it's some sort of sealer. Can I put thinset on top of this, or will I have to do some sort of prep work? I've tiled before, but never over sealed brick.
Thinset wont bond to sealed surfaces, so whatever sealer there is has to be removed. When you say sandy mortar, are you implying that the mortar is sandy, loose, cracked? What is the overall condition of the floor? Is everything nice and solid, no cracks?

Also, on a related note, I am constantly seeing tutorials, books, and television shows where tile is simply lain over the existing floor, yet no one ever talks about the increased height of the floor. How do you deal with that? The floors in the house are all at the same height right now. For instance, the brick transitions to the tile in our sunroom right now with no change in height. And what about doors? What will I need to do to compensate for the higher floor?
The increased height between rooms is common with ceramic tile and there various height transition solutions to choose from but added height in kitchens with under counter appliances, and exterior doors can be difficult. Anything is possible and never a problem on TV where everything and anything can be done in a half hour show.
 
  #3  
Old 05-02-08, 10:13 AM
J
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I meant sandy as in it has obvious big sand grains. The condition of the whole floor is solid as a rock, though. That's honestly one of the things I don't like about it. I like the give of a wooden floor. This feels like the inside of a cave, though. The condition is fine, though.
 
 

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