Why is my bathroom tile so high?


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Old 06-05-08, 06:30 PM
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Why is my bathroom tile so high?

I'm in the process of installing bamboo flooring in my master bedroom (5/8" planks). My master bathroom is 'OE' tile and after pulling out the carpet I noticed that that the height difference is approximately 2 1/4"!!! Is this typical? The existing marble threshold was build-up with what appeared to be almost 2" of concrete. This obviously isn't a good practice since the threshold has been cracked in half ever since I bought the house in 2001. So the question is - how do I do it right? Stack two or three marble thresholds using mastic and make it even with the bathroom floor? I'm open to ideas...

--Rob in DC


 
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Old 06-05-08, 06:52 PM
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Is this typical?
Yes and no. What you have is an old fashion method that is in fact the best method in existence. Today's method work just as well but reduce elevation issues of days past.

The existing marble threshold was build-up with what appeared to be almost 2" of concrete. This obviously isn't a good practice
Nonesense! That's the way that method is done. Who knows why the threshold cracked, too late to determine that now. Doesn't matter anyway.

...how do I do it right?
Duplicate what you removed if you intend to use another marble threshold.

...how do I do it right? Stack two or three marble thresholds using mastic and make it even with the bathroom floor?
No mastic, use mortar.

I'm open to ideas...
If it were me I would forget the marble and fashion myself a nice new tapered wood threshold that sits atop the new flooring once it is installed.
 
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Old 06-05-08, 07:09 PM
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You should also consider adding a layer of plywood to reduce the difference. A beveled or ramped marble threshold will also help. Do not stack thresholds.

That's the way floors used to be done, I ran into a bath floor with 3.5" of deck mud in a second story built in the '30's. Looks like 4.25" wall tile on that floor?

Jaz
 
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Old 06-05-08, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Looks like 4.25" wall tile on that floor?

Jaz
Yup, sure is. Is this also the "ol' fashion" way of doing bathroom floors?

Thanks for the input guys. Eventually I'm gonna get to the bathroom floor and replace it with some decent natural 12x12 tile. (Travertine perhaps) This means that getting the original tile out is going to be a major PITA...

PS. house was built in 1993...
 
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Old 06-06-08, 11:22 AM
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Is this also the "ol' fashion" way of doing bathroom floors?
Not necessarily the "old fashion" way as much as it is a period look. Yes this was common practice decades ago.

Just so happens I am duplicating such a thing in a new renovation next week. The customer wants that look from that period - so be it!
 
 

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