applying thinset to tile along chalk line?

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Old 11-28-08, 10:42 AM
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applying thinset to tile along chalk line?

I have chalked the center lines in the room i am going to tile. Then I realized that I would cover these reference lines when i layed the thinset. Should I apply it directly to the back of the tilealong these lines? If so, is there a correct way to do it? should I still leaves grooves like i would applying it to the floor with a trough?
 
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Old 11-28-08, 10:45 AM
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You'll be able to see the chaulk line after you use the notched side of the trowel. I didn't think you would either, but you can see it well enough to get the tile right.
 
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Old 11-28-08, 10:47 AM
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You should grid the entire floor. Use a sharpie to trace over the chalk lines so they dont dissappear as you move around the room. Start the thinset up against the lines, but not covering them so that you can see the lines and use them as a referrence.
 
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Old 11-28-08, 05:30 PM
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Gunguy,

If you can see the chalk lines after spreading thinset mortar over it, you are doing it wrong. You're supposed to first "burn" thinset to the floor using the flat side of the trowel, then apply more thinset and spread with the notched side.

It should be done as described by Johnny, thinset right up to it, not over it.

I would never put chalk lines or start tiling in the center of a room. Ceramic tile on floors is not done that way.

Jaz
 
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Old 11-28-08, 05:57 PM
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Well, only did it 2 times, but I used the flat side to push it tight to the substrate (ply and concrete), then used the notched side and I could still see the lines pretty well. That was with both thinset and mastic. Not saying I'm an expert, just what I experienced.

Most things I've seen/read say to find the center of the room and work from there. Maybe thats an amature way...dunno. Worked for me.

I hate tile anyway....I'm a wood and vinyl kinda guy...lol.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 05:57 AM
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JazMan, fill me in. Gridding the floor will indicate lines at certain places. Just where would you start the floor? I always start on my grids working my way to the edges where cuts are made if necessary.
When we do framing layouts on concrete floors to build walls, we snap red lines then spray over them with polyurethane. The lines stay put and we can sweep the floor without losing our lines.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 07:39 AM
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If you grid the whole floor, you can start anywhere you want. You can start in the back corner and work your way out of the room if thats the way you want to do it. Spraying something over chalk lines to hold them can affect thinset bond. You can use an ink line instead of a chalk line also. I bought an ink line to use with ditra but it didnt work real good on the ditra. It does work pretty good over concrete slabs, mud floors and cbu.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 08:57 PM
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Every job is different, however I can say I have never started an installation from the center grid lines. The term "centering" is not the right term for tiling anyway. I would use the term "squaring" instead. You want lines that are parallel with the wall, and square where they intersect. It is rare to find square rooms, yet you have to install the tiles square to each other.

Obviously you don't want to start in the exact center of the room. Doing so would divide the room in two or 4 parts, no need to do that. It might also give you small pieces on both walls. Where ever the grid lines are on the floor, you have imaginary lines at every tile joint. We only choose to draw a few reference line to work from.

Determine the main focal point or the longest straightest wall where tiles should be full or nearly whole. Measure out the length of 2 rows of tiles at apposite ends of this main wall and snap a chalkline. This line is parallel to this long wall. Determine how the tiles end at the wall apposite this main wall. If these tiles are less than half a tile, move the line closer to the main wall.

So now you have a line parallel to the main wall or focal point where you want the tiles to look the best. Let's say this line goes north and south. You now need to "square" a line east and west to the main line, giving you a starting point. I would want this starting point in a convenient location so I can work my way backwards out of the room to get to my staging area where the mixing and cutting will be done. To find this east/west line I measure 2 tiles away from the wall and place a long straight edge square to the original main line. Check the squareness of the intersection by using the Pythagorean Theorem. That is the 3-4-5 method to verify the intersection of two line are a perfect 90*.

You now have the starting place. Be sure to allow for all grout joints and expansion joints around the perimeter of the room.

Jaz
 
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Old 11-30-08, 06:18 PM
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I usually start by snapping a line from a wall equal to a certain number of tiles in the range of 3' since that is as far as I can reach. I cross that one with another line similarly.
I lucked out on my cabin last weekend using 12" tiles. I snapped a line 3' plus a little from a wall and 3' plus a little from the perpendicular wall. My cut tiles would be in a hidden laundry area, so I wasn't too concerned with equal number of cuts on opposite walls. As it would happen, I didn't have to cut a single tile in the entire job except for the doorway. Cool.
 
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Old 12-01-08, 06:14 AM
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well i found the center point of the room, then layed a dry run in every direction off of my lines to see where the tile would end up. One side would need about 2 inches so i measured 6 inches off my chalklines and snapped another line so that i would end up with half a tile all the way around the perimeter. I went over these lines with a sharpie and layed a row north and west and filled in that quadrant. then did the other 3 quadrants. It was late so I let it sit and went back in and did all the edges the next day. It was my first tile job and it worked pretty well. now gotta read up on grout!
 
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